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The Behavior Analyst

, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp 39–48 | Cite as

Overcorrection: Reviewed, Revisited and Revised

  • Sandra E. MacKenzie-Keating
  • Linda McDonald
Article

Abstract

Overcorrection is a widely used behavior management procedure, the success of which has been well documented. However, overcorrection is not a simple, single procedure. Rather, it is a complex combination of procedures that often make it a complicated strategy to understand conceptually and to implement correctly. The complex nature of overcorrection combined with the use of multiple labels has created much confusion and debate among both researchers and practitioners. A number of issues relating to overcorrection are examined and evaluated. A proposal is made for revising the present overcorrection terminology. Finally, directions for future research are suggested.

Key words

overcorrection punishment positive practice restitution training terminology 

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sandra E. MacKenzie-Keating
    • 1
  • Linda McDonald
    • 2
  1. 1.Glenrose Rehabilitation HospitalEdmontonCanada
  2. 2.Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada

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