The Behavior Analyst

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 99–101 | Cite as

The Influence of Behavior Analysis on The Surgeon General’s Report, The Health Consequences of Smoking: Nicotine Addiction

  • Jack E. Henningfield
  • Stephen T. Higgins
In Response

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jack E. Henningfield
    • 1
  • Stephen T. Higgins
    • 2
  1. 1.Addiction Research Center/National Institute on Drug AbuseBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Human Behavioral Pharmacology Laboratory, Department of PsychiatryUniversity of VermontBurlingtonUSA

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