The Behavior Analyst

, Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 253–276 | Cite as

Drifting? Course? Destination?: A Review of Research Methods in Applied Behavior Analysis: Issues and Advances

  • Beatrice H. Barrett
Book Review

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Beatrice H. Barrett
    • 1
  1. 1.Psychology DepartmentFernald State SchoolBelmontUSA

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