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The Behavior Analyst

, Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 175–181 | Cite as

On the Virtues of Being a Psychologist

  • Peter Harzem
Article

Abstract

Some changes that have taken place in psychology are discussed in the light of the presently urgent need for a new science of psychology that addresses the important social issues of our times. Substantial development of the experimental analysis of behavior is urged, through its formulation of research problems related to every aspect of contemporary life, extending from political negotiation and economic decision making to the study of personality and individual differences.

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Harzem
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyAuburn UniversityAlabamaUSA

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