The Behavior Analyst

, Volume 10, Issue 1, pp 83–88 | Cite as

Social Policy and the Role of the Behavior Analyst in the Prevention of Delinquent Behavior

  • John D. Burchard
Article

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to encourage behavior analysts to expand their domain of interest and application to include the “social/political” contingencies that are developed and implemented by policymakers and lawmakers. Using the Vermont juvenile justice system as a prototype, examples are provided that focus on the tertiary, secondary, and primary prevention of delinquent behavior.

Key words

social policy behavior analysis delinquent prevention probation custody 

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • John D. Burchard
    • 1
  1. 1.Psychology DepartmentUniversity of VermontBurlingtonUSA

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