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The Behavior Analyst

, Volume 6, Issue 2, pp 161–165 | Cite as

Twenty-five Years of JEAB: A Survey of Selected Demographic Characteristics Related to Publication Trends

  • R. Alan Williams
  • W. F. Buskist
Article

Abstract

Some demographic characteristics related to authorship of research reports in the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior (JEAB) were analyzed as to affiliation and location (U.S. or foreign) of authors. In addition, the incidence of publications by the members of the editorial board was tallied. The number of different affiliations of JEAB authors has decreased steadily over the past several years with substantially fewer papers deriving from independent laboratories and medical schools. While the number of papers by foreign authors has generally increased over the years there is a recent reduction in their number. These data paint a mixed picture of the “health” status of the experimental analysis of behavior as reflected in its major publication outlet.

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Reference Notes

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Alan Williams
    • 1
  • W. F. Buskist
    • 1
  1. 1.Psychology DepartmentAuburn UniversityAuburnUSA

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