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The Behavior Analyst

, Volume 6, Issue 2, pp 145–152 | Cite as

Participation by Women in Behavior Analysis

  • Alan Poling
  • Deborah Grossett
  • Barbara Fulton
  • Susan Roy
  • Susan Beechler
  • Connie J. Wittkopp
Article

Abstract

The participation of women in behavior analysis as authors of articles published in the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior (JEAB) and the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis (JABA), as members of the Association for Behavior Analysis (ABA), and as contributors to the 1982 ABA convention was examined. Since the inception of JEAB and JABA, men have appeared as authors far more frequently than women, although women have published relatively more frequently in the latter journal than in the former. Across years, there has been an upward trend in the proportion of JEAB authors who are female; this is not the case for all JABA authors, although it does hold for senior authors. In 1980–1981 and 1981–1982, females represented approximately half of ABA’s student and affiliate members but less than a third of its full members. Approximately a third of the contributors to posters and symposia and a seventh of those delivering invited addresses at the 1982 ABA convention were women.

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan Poling
    • 1
  • Deborah Grossett
    • 1
  • Barbara Fulton
    • 1
  • Susan Roy
    • 1
  • Susan Beechler
    • 1
  • Connie J. Wittkopp
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyWestern Michigan UniversityKalamazooUSA

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