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The Behavior Analyst

, Volume 5, Issue 2, pp 109–125 | Cite as

Comments on Cognitive Science in the Experimental Analysis of Behavior

  • Edward K. Morris
  • Stephen T. Higgins
  • Warren K. Bickel
Article

Abstract

Arguments are increasingly being made for the inclusion of cognitive science in the experimental analysis of behavior (TEAB). These arguments are described, and a critical analysis of them is presented, especially in regards to the logic of objective inference and the renewed use of cognitive intervening variables. In addition, one particular defining feature of cognitive processes (i.e., the absence of an immediate controlling stimulus) is described, along with alternative points of view stressing molar-molecular levels of analysis and historical causation. Finally, comments are made on the use of cognitive concepts and language in the behavioral sciences. On all of these issues, counter-arguments are based on available material in behavior analysis metatheory, concepts, and experimental practices.

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward K. Morris
    • 1
  • Stephen T. Higgins
    • 1
  • Warren K. Bickel
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Human DevelopmentUniversity of KansasLawrenceUSA

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