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The Behavior Analyst

, Volume 1, Issue 1, pp 34–47 | Cite as

Engineering Environments for Behavioral Opportunities in the Zoo

  • Hal Markowitz
Article

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References

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hal Markowitz
    • 1
  1. 1.Washington Park ZooPortlandUSA

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