Skip to main content

Evaluating the evidence base for relational frame theory: A citation analysis

Abstract

Relational frame theory (RFT) is a contemporary behavior-analytic account of language and cognition. Since it was first outlined in 1985, RFT has generated considerable controversy and debate, and several claims have been made concerning its evidence base. The present study sought to evaluate the evidence base for RFT by undertaking a citation analysis and by categorizing all articles that cited RFT-related search terms. A total of 174 articles were identified between 1991 and 2008, 62 (36%) of which were empirical and 112 (64%) were nonempirical articles. Further analyses revealed that 42 (68%) of the empirical articles were classified as empirical RFT and 20 (32%) as empirical other, whereas 27 (24%) of the nonempirical articles were assigned to the nonempirical reviews category and 85 (76%) to the nonempirical conceptual category. In addition, the present findings show that the majority of empirical research on RFT has been conducted with typically developing adult populations, on the relational frame of sameness, and has tended to be published in either The Psychological Record or the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. Overall, RFT has made a substantial contribution to the literature in a relatively short period of time.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

References

  1. Alos, F. J., & Lora, M. D. (2007). Contextual control in teaching numbers to a child with intellectual disabilities. Psicothema, 19, 435–439.

    PubMed  Google Scholar 

  2. Augustson, E. M., Dougher, M. J., & Markham, M. R. (2000). Emergence of conditional stimulus relations and transfer of respondent eliciting functions among compound stimuli. The Psychological Record, 50, 745–770.

    Google Scholar 

  3. Austin, J., & Wilson, K. G. (2001). Response-response relationships in organizational behavior management. Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, 21, 39–53.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  4. Barnes, D. (1994). Stimulus equivalence and relational frame theory. The Psychological Record, 44, 91–124.

    Google Scholar 

  5. Barnes, D. (1996). Naming as a technical term: Sacrificing behavior analysis at the altar of popularity? Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 65, 264–267.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  6. Barnes, D., & Keenan, M. (1993). Concurrent activities and instructed human fixed-interval performance. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 59, 501–520.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  7. Barnes, D., & Roche, B. (1996). Relational frame theory and stimulus equivalence are fundamentally different: A reply to Saunders’ commentary. The Psychological Record, 46, 489–507.

    Google Scholar 

  8. Barnes, D., & Roche, B. (1997a). A behavior-analytic approach to behavioral reflexivity. The Psychological Record, 47, 543–572.

    Google Scholar 

  9. Barnes, D., & Roche, B. (1997b). Relational frame theory and the experimental analysis of human sexuality. Applied & Preventive Psychology, 6, 117–135.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  10. Barnes-Holmes, D., & Barnes-Holmes, Y. (2000). Explaining complex behavior: Two perspectives on the concept of generalized operant classes. The Psychological Record, 50, 251–265.

    Google Scholar 

  11. Barnes-Holmes, D., Barnes-Holmes, Y., & Cullinan, V. (2000). Relational frame theory and Skinner’s Verbal Behavior: A possible synthesis. The Behavior Analyst, 23, 69–84.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  12. Barnes-Holmes, D., Barnes-Holmes, Y., Smeets, P. M., Cullinan, V., & Leader, G. (2004). Relational frame theory and stimulus equivalence: Conceptual and procedural issues. International Journal of Psychology & Psychological Therapy, 4, 181–214.

    Google Scholar 

  13. Barnes-Holmes, D., Cochrane, A., Barnes-Holmes, Y., Stewart, I., & McHugh, L. (2004). Psychological acceptance: Experimental analyses and theoretical interpretations. International Journal of Psychology & Psychological Therapy, 4, 517–530.

    Google Scholar 

  14. Barnes-Holmes, D., Dymond, S., Roche, B., & Grey, I. (1999). Language and cognition. The Psychologist, 12, 500–504.

    Google Scholar 

  15. Barnes-Holmes, D., & Hayes, S. C. (2003). A reply to Galizio’s “The abstracted operant: A review of Relational Frame Theory: A Post-Skinnerian Account of Human Language and Cognition.” The Behavior Analyst, 26, 305–310.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  16. Barnes-Holmes, D., Luciano, C. M., & Barnes-Holmes, Y. (2004). Introductory comments to the series on relational frame theory. International Journal of Psychology & Psychological Therapy, 4, 177–179.

    Google Scholar 

  17. Barnes-Holmes, D., Regan, D., Barnes-Holmes, Y., Commins, S., Walsh, D., Stewart, I., et al. (2005). Relating derived relations as a model of analogical reasoning: Reaction times and event-related potentials. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 84, 435–451.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  18. Barnes-Holmes, D., Staunton, C., Barnes-Holmes, Y., Whelan, R., Stewart, I., Commins, S., et al. (2004). Interfacing relational frame theory with cognitive neuroscience: Semantic priming, the implicit association test, and event related potentials. International Journal of Psychology & Psychological Therapy, 4, 215–240.

    Google Scholar 

  19. Barnes-Holmes, D., Valverde, M. R., & Whelan, R. (2005). Relational frame theory and the experimental analysis of language and cognition. Revista Latinoamericana de Psicologia, 37, 255–275.

    Google Scholar 

  20. Barnes-Holmes, Y., Barnes-Holmes, D., & Cullinan, V. (2001). Education. In S. C. Hayes, D. Barnes-Holmes, & B. Roche (Eds.), Relational frame theory: A post-Skin-nerian account of human language and cognition (pp. 181–195). New York: Plenum.

    Google Scholar 

  21. Barnes-Holmes, Y., Barnes-Holmes, D., McHugh, L., & Hayes, S. C. (2004). Relational frame theory: Some implications for understanding and treating human psychopathology. International Journal of Psychology & Psychological Therapy, 4, 355–375.

    Google Scholar 

  22. Barnes-Holmes, Y., Barnes-Holmes, D., & Murphy, C. (2004). Teaching the generic skills of language and cognition: Contributions from relational frame theory. In D. J. Moran & R. W. Malott (Eds.), Evidence-based educational methods (pp. 277–292). London: Elsevier Science/Academic Press.

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  23. Barnes-Holmes, Y., Barnes-Holmes, D., Roche, B., & Smeets, P. M. (2001a). Exemplar training and a derived transformation of function in accordance with symmetry. The Psychological Record, 51, 287–308.

    Google Scholar 

  24. Barnes-Holmes, Y., Barnes-Holmes, D., Roche, B., & Smeets, P. M. (2001b). Exemplar training and a derived transformation of function in accordance with symmetry: II. The Psychological Record, 51, 589–603.

    Google Scholar 

  25. Barnes-Holmes, Y., Barnes-Holmes, D., Smeets, P. M., Strand, P., & Friman, P. (2004). Establishing relational responding in accordance with more-than and less-than as generalized operant behavior in young children. International Journal of Psychology & Psychological Therapy, 4, 531–558.

    Google Scholar 

  26. Barnes-Holmes, Y., Hayes, S. C., Barnes-Holmes, D., & Roche, B. (2001). Relational frame theory: A post-Skinnerian account of human language and cognition. Advances in Child Development and Behavior, 28, 101–138.

    PubMed  Article  Google Scholar 

  27. Berens, N. M., & Hayes, S. C. (2007). Arbitrarily applicable comparative relations: Experimental evidence for a relational operant. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysi, 40, 45–71.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  28. Blackledge, J. T. (2007). Disrupting verbal processes: Cognitive defusion in acceptance and commitment therapy and other mind-fulness-based psychotherapies. The Psychological Record, 57, 555–576.

    Google Scholar 

  29. Boelens, H. (1996). Accounting for stimulus equivalence: Reply to Hayes and Wilson. The Psychological Record, 46, 237–242.

    Google Scholar 

  30. Bond, F. W., Hayes, S. C., & Barnes-Holmes, D. (2006). Psychological flexibility, ACT, and organizational behavior. Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, 26, 25–54.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  31. Burgos, J. E. (2003). Laudable goals, interesting experiments, unintelligible theorizing: A critical review of Relational Frame Theory. Behavior & Philosophy, 31, 19–45.

    Google Scholar 

  32. Burgos, J. E. (2004). Is relational frame theory intelligible? Acta Comportamentalia, 12, 53–73.

    Google Scholar 

  33. Burgos, J. E., & Donahoe, J. W. (2000). Structure and function in selectionism: Implications for complex behavior. In J. C. Leslie & D. Blackman (Eds.), Experimental and applied analyses of human behavior (pp. 39–57). Reno, NV: Context Press.

    Google Scholar 

  34. Carr, J. E., & Britton, L. N. (2003). Citation trends of applied journals in behavioral psychology: 1981–2000. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysi, 36, 113–117.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  35. Ciarrochi, J., & Robb, H. (2005). Letting a little nonverbal air into the room: Insights from acceptance and commitment therapy: Part 2. Applications. Journal of Rational-Emotive & Cognitive Behavior Therapy, 23, 107–130.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  36. Ciarrochi, J., Robb, H., & Godsell, C. (2005). Letting a little nonverbal air into the room: Insights from acceptance and commitment therapy: Part 1. Philosophical and theoretical underpinnings. Journal of Rational-Emotive & Cognitive Behavior Therapy, 23, 79–106.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  37. Clayton, M. C., & Hayes, L. J. (1999). Conceptual differences in the analysis of stimulus equivalence. The Psychological Record, 49, 145–161.

    Google Scholar 

  38. Coyne, L. W., & Wilson, K. G. (2004). The role of cognitive fusion in impaired parenting: An RFT analysis. International Journal of Psychology & Psychological Therapy, 4, 469–486.

    Google Scholar 

  39. Critchfield, T. S. (2002). Evaluating the function of applied behavior analysis: A bibliometric analysis. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysi, 35, 423–426.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  40. Cullinan, V. A., Barnes-Holmes, D., & Smeets, P. M. (2000). A precursor to the relational evaluation procedure: Analyzing stimulus equivalence II. The Psychological Record, 50, 467–492.

    Google Scholar 

  41. Cullinan, V. A., Barnes-Holmes, D., & Smeets, P. M. (2001). A precursor to the relational evaluation procedure: Searching for the contextual cues that control equivalence responding. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 76, 339–349.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  42. De Mey, H. R. A. (2003). Two psychologies: Cognitive versus contingency-oriented. Theory & Psychology, 13, 695–709.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  43. Devany, J. M., Hayes, S. C., & Nelson, R. O. (1986). Equivalence class formation in language-able and language-disabled children. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 46, 243–257.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  44. Dixon, M. R., Dymond, S., Rehfeldt, R. A., Roche, B., & Zlomke, K. R. (2003). Terrorism and relational frame theory. Behavior and Social Issue, 12, 129–147.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  45. Dixon, M. R., Small, S. L., & Rosales, R. (2007). Extended analysis of empirical citations with Skinner’s Verbal Behavior: 1984–2004. The Behavior Analyst, 30, 197–209.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  46. Dixon, M. R., & Zlomke, K. M. (2005). Using the precursor to the relational evaluation procedure (pREP) to establish the relational frames of sameness, opposition, and distinction. Revista Latinoamericana de Psicologia, 37, 305–316.

    Google Scholar 

  47. Dougher, M. J. (2002). This is not B. F. Skinner’s behavior analysis: A review of Hayes, Strosahl, and Wilson’s Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysi, 35, 323–336.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  48. Dougher, M. J., Hamilton, D. A., Fink, B. C., & Harrington, J. (2007). Transformation of the discriminative and eliciting functions of generalized relational stimuli. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 88, 179–197.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  49. Dougher, M., Perkins, D. R., Greenway, D., Koons, A., & Chiasson, C. (2002). Contextual control of equivalence-based transformation of functions. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 78, 63–93.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  50. Dymond, S. (2002). The next generation: Authorship trends in the experimental analysis of human behavior (1980–1999). Experimental Analysis of Human Behavior Bulletin, 20, 1–8.

    Google Scholar 

  51. Dymond, S. (2005). Learning across the life span: A review of Child and Adolescent Development: A Behavioral Systems Approach. Infant and Child Development, 14, 430–432.

    Google Scholar 

  52. Dymond, S., & Alonso-Alvarez, B. (in press). The selective impact of Skinner’s Verbal Behavior on empirical research: A reply to Schlinger (2008). The Psychological Record.

  53. Dymond, S., & Barnes, D. (1995). A transformation of self-discrimination response functions in accordance with the arbitrarily applicable relations of sameness, more than, and less than. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 64, 163–184.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  54. Dymond, S., & Barnes, D. (1996). A transformation of self-discrimination response functions in accordance with the arbitrarily applicable relations of sameness and opposition. The Psychological Record, 46, 271–300.

    Google Scholar 

  55. Dymond, S., & Barnes, D. (1998). The effects of prior equivalence testing and detailed verbal instructions on derived self-discrimination transfer: A follow-up study. The Psychological Record, 48, 147–170.

    Google Scholar 

  56. Dymond, S., & Critchfield, T. S. (2001). Neither dark age nor renaissance: Research and authorships trends in the experimental analysis of human behavior (1980–1999). The Behavior Analyst, 24, 241–253.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  57. Dymond, S., O’Hora, D., Whelan, R., & O’Donovan, A. (2006). Citation analysis of Skinner’s Verbal Behavior: 1984–2004. The Behavior Analyst, 29, 75–88.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  58. Dymond, S., & Rehfeldt, R. (2000). Understanding complex behavior: The transformation of stimulus functions. The Behavior Analyst, 23, 239–254.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  59. Dymond, S., Roche, B., & Barnes-Holmes, D. (2003). The continuity strategy, human behavior, and behavior analysis. The Psychological Record, 53, 333–347.

    Google Scholar 

  60. Dymond, S., Roche, B., Forsyth, J. P., Whelan, R., & Rhoden, J. (2007). Transformation of avoidance response functions in accordance with same and opposite relational frames. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 88, 249–262.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  61. Dymond, S., Roche, B., Forsyth, J. P., Whelan, R., & Rhoden, J. (2008). Derived avoidance learning: Transformation of avoidance response functions in accordance with same and opposite relational frames. The Psychological Record, 58, 271–288.

    Google Scholar 

  62. Dymond, S., Roche, B., & Rehfeldt, R. A. (2005). Relational frame theory and the transformation of stimulus function. Revista Latinoamericana de Psicologia, 37, 291–303.

    Google Scholar 

  63. Ellis, A. (2005). Can rational-emotive behavior therapy (REBT) and acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) resolve their differences and be integrated? Journal of Rational-Emotive & Cognitive Behavior Therapy, 23, 153–168.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  64. Fletcher, L., & Hayes, S. C. (2005). Relational frame theory, acceptance and commitment therapy, and a functional analytic definition of mindfulness. Journal of Rational-Emotive & Cognitive Behavior Therapy, 23, 315–336.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  65. Fox, E. J. (2006). Clarifying functional con-textualism: A reply to commentaries. Educational Technology Research and Development, 54, 61–64.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  66. Frank, A. J. (2004). Review of Relational Frame Theory: A Post-Skinnerian Account of Human Language and Cognition. Pragmatics & Cognition, 12, 169–177.

    Google Scholar 

  67. Friman, P. C., Hayes, S. C., & Wilson, K. G. (1998). Why behavior analysts should study emotion: The example of anxiety. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysi, 31, 137–156.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  68. Galizio, M. (2003). The abstracted operant: A review of Relational Frame Theory: A Post-Skinnerian Account of Human Language and Cognition. The Behavior Analyst, 26, 159–169.

    PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  69. Galizio, M. (2004). Relational frames: Where do they come from? A comment on Barnes-Holmes and Hayes (2003). The Behavior Analyst, 27, 107–112.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  70. Garcia, Y. A. (2003). Relational frame theory: A post-Skinnerian account of human language and cognition. Revista Latinoamericana de Psicologia, 35, 99–100.

    Google Scholar 

  71. Garfield, E. (1972). Citation analysis as a tool in journal evaluation. Science, 178, 471–479.

    PubMed  Article  Google Scholar 

  72. Gavin, A., Roche, B., & Ruiz, M. R. (2008). Competing contingencies over derived relational responding: A behavioral model of the implicit association test. The Psychological Record, 58, 427–441.

    Google Scholar 

  73. Giurfa, M., Zhang, S., Jenett, A., Menzel, R., & Srinivasan, M. V. (2001). The concepts of “sameness” and “difference” in an insect. Nature, 410, 930–933.

    PubMed  Article  Google Scholar 

  74. Gomez, S., Barnes-Holmes, D., & Luciano, M. C. (2001). Generalized break equivalence I. The Psychological Record, 51, 131–150.

    Google Scholar 

  75. Gomez, S., Lopez, F., Martin, C. B., Barnes-Holmes, Y., & Barnes-Holmes, D. (2007). Exemplar training and a derived transformation of functions in accordance with symmetry and equivalence. The Psychological Record, 57, 273–293.

    Google Scholar 

  76. Gomez-Martin, S., Lopez-Rios, F., & Mesa-Manjon, H. (2007). Relational frame theory: Some implications for psychopathology and psychotherapy. International Journal of Clinical and Health Psychology, 7, 491–507.

    Google Scholar 

  77. Gross, A., & Fox, E. J. (2009). Relational frame theory: An overview of the controversy. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 25, 87–98.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  78. Haas, J. R., & Hayes, S. C. (2006). When knowing you are doing well hinders performance: Exploring the interaction between rules and feedback. Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, 26, 91–111.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  79. Hayes, S. C. (1996). Developing a theory of derived stimulus relations. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 65, 309–311.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  80. Hayes, S. C. (2004a). Acceptance and commitment therapy, relational frame theory, and the third wave of behavioral and cognitive therapies. Behavior Therapy, 35, 639–665.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  81. Hayes, S. C. (2004b). Fleeing from the elephant: Language, cognition and post-Skinnerian behavior analytic science. Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, 24, 155–173.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  82. Hayes, S. C. (2005). Stability and change in cognitive behavior therapy: Considering the implications of ACT and RFT. Journal of Rational-Emotive & Cognitive Behavior Therapy, 23, 131–151.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  83. Hayes, S. C. (2007). Mindfulness from the bottom up: Providing an inductive framework for understanding mindfulness processes and their application to human suffering. Psychological Inquiry, 18, 242–248.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  84. Hayes, S. C. (2008). Climbing our hills: A beginning conversation on the comparison of acceptance and commitment therapy and traditional cognitive behavioral therapy. Clinical Psychology-Science and Practice, 15, 286–295.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  85. Hayes, S. C., & Barnes, D. (1997). Analyzing derived stimulus relations requires more than the concept of stimulus class. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 68, 235–244.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  86. Hayes, S. C., & Barnes-Holmes, D. (2004). Relational operants: Processes and implications: A response to Palmer’s review of relational frame theory. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 82, 213–224.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  87. Hayes, S. C., Barnes-Holmes, D., & Roche, B. (Eds.). (2001). Relational frame theory: A post-Skinnerian account of human language and cognition New York: Kluwer Academic/Plenum.

    Google Scholar 

  88. Hayes, S. C., Barnes-Holmes, D., & Roche, B. (2003). Behavior analysis, relational frame theory, and the challenge of human language and cognition: A reply to the commentaries on Relational Frame Theory: A Post-Skinnerian Account of Human Language and Cognition. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 19, 39–54.

    PubMed  Google Scholar 

  89. Hayes, S. C., & Berens, N. M. (2004). Why relational frame theory alters the relationship between basic and applied behavioral psychology. International Journal of Psychology & Psychological Therapy, 4, 341–353.

    Google Scholar 

  90. Hayes, S. C., Bunting, K., Herbst, S., Bond, F. W., & Barnes-Holmes, D. (2006). Expanding the scope of organizational behavior management: Relational frame theory and the experimental analysis of complex human behavior. Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, 26, 1–23.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  91. Hayes, S. C., Fox, E., Gifford, E. V., Wilson, K. G., Barnes-Holmes, D., & Healy, O. (2001). Derived relational responding as learned behavior. In S. C. Hayes, D. Barnes-Holmes, & B. Roche (Eds.), Relational frame theory: A post-Skinnerian account of language and cognition (pp. 21–49). New York: Kluwer Academic/Plenum.

    Google Scholar 

  92. Hayes, S. C., Gifford, E. V., & Hayes, G. J. (1998). Moral behavior and the development of verbal regulation. The Behavior Analyst, 21, 253–279.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  93. Hayes, S. C., & Hayes, L. J. (1989). The verbal action of the listener as the basis for rule governance. In S. C. Hayes (Ed.), Rule-governed behavior: Cognition, contingencies and instructional control (pp. 153–190). New York: Plenum.

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  94. Hayes, S. C., & Hayes, L. J. (1992). Verbal relations and the evolution of behavior analysis. American Psychologist, 47, 1383–1395.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  95. Hayes, S. C., & Leonhard, C. (1994). An alternative behavior-analytic approach to verbal behavior. Revista Mexicana de Psicologia, 11, 69–86.

    Google Scholar 

  96. Hayes, S. C., Luoma, J. B., Bond, F. W., Masuda, A., & Lillis, J. (2006). Acceptance and commitment therapy: Model, processes and outcomes. Behaviour Research & Therapy, 44, 1–25.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  97. Hayes, S. C., & Quinones, R. M. (2005). Characterizing relational operants. Revista Latinoamericana de Psicologia, 37(2), 277–289.

    Google Scholar 

  98. Hayes, S. C., Strosahl, K., & Wilson, K. G. (1999). Acceptance and commitment therapy: An experiential approach to behavior change New York: Guilford.

    Google Scholar 

  99. Hayes, S. C., Strosahl, K., Wilson, K. G., Bissett, R. T., Pistorello, J., Toarmino, D., et al. (2004). Measuring experiential avoidance: A preliminary test of a working model. The Psychological Record, 54, 553–578.

    Google Scholar 

  100. Hayes, S. C., & Wilson, K. G. (1993). Some applied implications of a contemporary behavior-analytic account of verbal events. The Behavior Analyst, 16, 283–301.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  101. Hayes, S. C., & Wilson, K. G. (1995). The role of cognition in complex human behavior: A contextualistic perspective. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 26, 241–248.

    PubMed  Article  Google Scholar 

  102. Hayes, S. C., & Wilson, K. G. (1996). Criticisms of relational frame theory: Implications for a behavior analytic account of derived stimulus relations. The Psychological Record, 46, 221–236.

    Google Scholar 

  103. Healy, O., Barnes, D., & Smeets, P. M. (1998). Derived relational responding as an operant: The effects of between-session feedback. The Psychological Record, 48, 511–536.

    Google Scholar 

  104. Healy, O., Barnes-Holmes, D., & Smeets, P. M. (2000). Derived relational responding as generalized operant behavior. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 74, 207–227.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  105. Hernandez, A., & Garcia, Y. A. (2005). Preliminary considerations to the study of relational frames. Revista Latinoamericana de Psicologia, 37, 243–254.

    Google Scholar 

  106. Higuera, J. A. G. (2006). Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) as a cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) development. Revista de Psicologia y Psicopedagogia, 5, 287–304.

    Google Scholar 

  107. Hineline, P. N. (1997). How, then, shall we characterize this elephant? Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 68, 297–300.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  108. Holden, B. (2007). Acceptance and commitment therapy: A behavior analytic psychotherapy. Tidsskrift for Norsk Psykologforening, 44, 1118–1126.

    Google Scholar 

  109. Horne, P. J., & Lowe, C. F. (1996). On the origins of naming and other symbolic behavior. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 65, 185–241.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  110. Horne, P. J., & Lowe, C. F. (1997). Toward a theory of verbal behavior. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 68, 271–296.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  111. Ingvarsson, E. T., & Morris, E. K. (2004). Post-Skinnerian, post-Skinner, or neo-Skin-nerian? Hayes, Barnes-Holmes, and Roche’s Relational Frame Theory. The Psychological Record, 54, 497–504.

    Google Scholar 

  112. Jesus, M., Garcia, M., Gomez-Becerra, I., Chavez-Brown, M., & Greer, D. (2006). Perspective taking and theory of the mind: Conceptual and empirical issues. A complementary and pragmatic proposal. Salud Mental, 29, 11–18.

    Google Scholar 

  113. Kanter, J. W., Baruch, D. E., & Gaynor, S. T. (2006). Acceptance and commitment therapy and behavioral activation for the treatment of depression: Description and comparison. The Behavior Analyst, 29, 161–185.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  114. Kanter, J. W., Busch, A. M., Weeks, C. E., & Landes, S. J. (2008). The nature of clinical depression: Symptoms, syndromes, and behavior analysis. The Behavior Analyst, 31, 1–21.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  115. Kanter, J. W., Parker, C. R., & Kohlenberg, R. J. (2001). Finding the self: A behavioral measure and its clinical implications. Psychotherapy, 38, 198–211.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  116. Leigland, S. (1997). Is a new definition of verbal behavior necessary in light of derived relational responding? The Behavior Analyst, 20, 3–9.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  117. Leydesdorff, L. (2009). How are new citation-based journal indicators adding to the bibliometric toolbox? Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 60, 1327–1336.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  118. Lillis, J., & Hayes, S. C. (2007). Applying acceptance, mindfulness, and values to the reduction of prejudice: A pilot study. Behavior Modification, 31, 389–411.

    PubMed  Article  Google Scholar 

  119. Lopez, C. A., Munoz, A., & Ballesteros, B. P. (2005). Changing socio-verbal context in women at risk of developing alimentary problems: A relational frame approach. Revista Latinoamericana de Psicologia, 37, 359–378.

    Google Scholar 

  120. Lopez, F., & Javier, C. (2003). Private events: A conceptual reconstruction. Apuntes de Psicologia, 21, 157–176.

    Google Scholar 

  121. Lowe, C. F., & Horne, P. J. (1996). Reflections on naming and other symbolic behavior. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 65, 315–353.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  122. Luciano, M. C., Becerra, I. G., & Valverde, M. R. (2007). The role of multiple-exemplar training and naming in establishing derived equivalence in an infant. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 87, 349–365.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  123. Luciano, M. C., Herruzo, J., & Barnes-Holmes, D. (2001). Generalization of say-do correspondence. The Psychological Record, 51, 111–130.

    Google Scholar 

  124. Malone, J. C. (2003). Advances in behaviorism: It’s not what it used to be. Journal of Behavioral Education, 12, 85–89.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  125. Malott, R. W. (2003). Behavior analysis and linguistic productivity. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 19, 11–18.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  126. Marcon-Dawson, A., Vicars, S. M., & Miguel, C. F. (2009). Publication trends in The Analysis of Verbal Behavior: 1999–2008. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 25, 123–132.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  127. Marr, M. J. (2003). Relational frame theory: A post-Skinnerian account of human language and cognition. Contemporary Psychology APA Review of Book, 48, 526–529.

    Google Scholar 

  128. Martinez, O. G., & Soriano, C. L. (2006). A study of pain in the perspective of verbal behavior: From the contributions of W. E. Fordyce to relational frame theory (RFT). International Journal of Clinical and Health Psychology, 6, 169–188.

    Google Scholar 

  129. McHugh, L., Barnes-Holmes, Y., & Barnes-Holmes, D. (2004a). Perspective-taking as relational responding: A developmental profile. The Psychological Record, 54, 115–144.

    Google Scholar 

  130. McHugh, L., Barnes-Holmes, Y., & Barnes-Holmes, D. (2004b). Relational frame account of the development of complex cognitive phenomena: Perspective-taking, false belief understanding, and deception. International Journal of Psychology & Psychological Therapy, 4, 303–324.

    Google Scholar 

  131. McHugh, L., Barnes-Holmes, Y., Barnes-Holmes, D., & Stewart, I. (2006). Understanding false belief as generalized operant behavior. The Psychological Record, 56, 341–364.

    Google Scholar 

  132. McHugh, L., Barnes-Holmes, Y., Barnes-Holmes, D., Stewart, I., & Dymond, S. (2007). Deictic relational complexity and the development of deception. The Psychological Record, 57, 517–531.

    Google Scholar 

  133. McIlvane, W. J. (2003). A stimulus in need of a response: A review of Relational Frame Theory: A Post-Skinnerian Account of Human Language and Cognition. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 19, 29–37.

    PubMed  Google Scholar 

  134. Merwin, R. M., & Wilson, K. G. (2005). Preliminary findings on the effects of self-referring and evaluative stimuli on stimulus equivalence class formation. The Psychological Record, 55, 561–575.

    Google Scholar 

  135. Michael, J., & Malott, R. W. (2003). Michael and Malott’s dialogue on linguistic productivity. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 19, 115–118.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  136. Minster, S. T., Jones, M., Elliffe, D., & Muthukumaraswamy, S. D. (2006). Stimulus equivalence: Testing Sidman’s (2000) theory. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 85, 371–391.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  137. Moore, J. (2000). Thinking about thinking and feeling about feeling. The Behavior Analyst, 23, 45–56.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  138. Mosticoni, R. (2007). Identity: The functions of self. Acta Comportamentalia, 15, 71–82.

    Google Scholar 

  139. Murphy, C., Barnes-Holmes, D., & Barnes-Holmes, Y. (2005). Derived manding in children with autism: Synthesizing Skinner’s Verbal Behavior with relational frame theory. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysi, 38, 445–462.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  140. Myles, S. M. (2004). Understanding and treating loss of sense of self following brain injury: A behavior analytic approach. International Journal of Psychology & Psychological Therapy, 4, 487–504.

    Google Scholar 

  141. Neziroglu, F., Khemlani-Patel, S., & Veale, D. (2008). Social learning theory and cognitive behavioral models of body dysmorphic disorder. Body Image, 5, 28–38.

    PubMed  Article  Google Scholar 

  142. Ninness, C., Rumph, R., McCuller, G., Harrison, C., Ford, A. M., & Ninness, S. K. (2005). A functional analytic approach to computer-interactive mathematics. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysi, 38, 1–22.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  143. Northup, J., Vollmer, T. R., & Serrett, K. (1993). Publication trends in 25 years of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysi, 26, 527–537.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  144. O’Hora, D., & Barnes-Holmes, D. (2004). Instructional control: Developing a relational frame analysis. International Journal of Psychology & Psychological Therapy, 4, 263–284.

    Google Scholar 

  145. O’Hora, D., Barnes-Holmes, D., Roche, B., & Smeets, P. M. (2004). Derived relational networks and control by novel instructions: A possible model of generative verbal responding. The Psychological Record, 54, 437–460.

    Google Scholar 

  146. O’Hora, D., & Maglieri, K. A. (2006). Goal statements and goal-directed behavior: A relational frame account of goal setting in organizations. Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, 25, 131–170.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  147. O’Hora, D., Pelaez, M., Barnes-Holmes, D., Rae, G., Robinson, K., & Chaudhary, T. (2008). Temporal relations and intelligence: Correlating relational performance with performance on the WAIS-II. The Psychological Record, 58, 569–583.

    Google Scholar 

  148. O’Hora, D., Roche, B., Barnes-Holmes, D., & Smeets, P. M. (2002). Response latencies to multiple derived stimulus relations: Testing two predictions of relational frame theory. The Psychological Record, 52, 51–75.

    Google Scholar 

  149. Osborne, J. G. (2003). Beyond Skinner? A review of Relational Frame Theory: A Post-Skinnerian Account of Human Language and Cognition. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 19, 19–27.

    PubMed  Google Scholar 

  150. O’Toole, C., Murphy, C., & Barnes-Holmes, D. (2009). Teaching flexible, intelligent, and creative behavior. In R. A. Rehfeldt & Y. Barnes-Holmes (Eds.), Derived relational responding: Applications for learners with autism and other developmental disabilities (pp. 353–372. Oakland, CA: Context Press/ New Harbinger.

    Google Scholar 

  151. Paez-Blarrina, M., Luciano, M. C., Gutiérrez-Martínez, O., Valdivia, S., Rodríguez-Val-verde, M., & Ortega, J. (2008). Coping with pain in the motivational context of values: Comparison between an acceptance-based and a cognitive control-based protocol. Behavior Modification, 32, 403–422.

    PubMed  Article  Google Scholar 

  152. Palmer, D. C. (2004a). Data in search of a principle: A review of Relational Frame Theory: A Post-Skinnerian Account of Human Language and Cognition. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 81, 189–204.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  153. Palmer, D. C. (2004b). Generic response classes and relational frame theory: Response to Hayes and Barnes-Holmes. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 82, 225–234.

    PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  154. Paul, H. A. (2004). Relational Frame Theory: A Post-Skinnerian Account of Human Language and Cognition [Review]. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 11, 337–339.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  155. Pelaez, M., & Moreno, R. (1998). A taxonomy of rules and their correspondence to rule-governed behavior. Revista Mexicana de Analisis de la Conducta, 24, 197–214.

    Google Scholar 

  156. Pena-Correall, T. E. (2007). B. F. Skinner’s Verbal Behavior: 1957–2007. Revista Latinoamericana de Psicologia, 39, 653–661.

    Google Scholar 

  157. Perez-Gonzalez, L. A., & Alonso-Alvarez, B. (2008). Common control by compound samples in conditional discriminations. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 90, 81–101.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  158. Perez-Gonzalez, L. A., & Martinez, H. (2007). Control by contextual stimuli in novel second-order conditional discriminations. The Psychological Record, 57, 117–143.

    Google Scholar 

  159. Perez-Gonzalez, L. A., & Serna, R. W. (2003). Transfer of specific contextual functions to novel conditional discriminations. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 79, 395–408.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  160. Petursdottir, A. I., Peterson, S. P., & Peters, A. C. (2009). A quarter century of The Analysis of Verbal Behavior: An analysis of impact. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 25, 109–121.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  161. Piazza, C. (2009, May). JABA and the impact factor. Presentation at the annual convention of the Association for Behavior Analysis International, Phoenix.

  162. Rehfeldt, R., Dillen, J. E., Ziomek, M. M., & Kowalchuk, R. K. (2007). Assessing relational learning deficits in perspective taking in children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder. The Psychological Record, 57, 23–47.

    Google Scholar 

  163. Reilly, T., Whelan, R., & Barnes-Holmes, D. (2005). The effect of training structure on the latency of responses to a five-term linear chain. The Psychological Record, 55, 233–249.

    Google Scholar 

  164. Robb, H., & Ciarrochi, J. (2005). Some final, gulp, “words” on REBT, ACT & RFT. Journal of Rational-Emotive & Cognitive Behavior Therapy, 23, 169–173.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  165. Roche, B., & Barnes, D. (1996). Arbitrarily applicable relational responding and sexual categorization: A critical test of the derived difference relation. The Psychological Record, 46, 451–475.

    Google Scholar 

  166. Roche, B., & Barnes, D. (1997). A transformation of respondently conditioned stimulus function in accordance with arbitrarily applicable relations. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 67, 275–301.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  167. Roche, B., & Barnes, D. (1998). The experimental analysis of human sexual arousal: Some recent developments. The Behavior Analyst, 21, 37–52.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  168. Roche, B., & Barnes-Holmes, D. (2003). Behavior analysis and social constructionism: Some points of contact and departure. The Behavior Analyst, 26, 215–231.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  169. Roche, B., Barnes-Holmes, D., Smeets, P. M., Barnes-Holmes, Y., & McGeady, S. (2000). Contextual control over the derived transformation of discriminative and sexual arousal functions. The Psychological Record, 50, 267–291.

    Google Scholar 

  170. Roche, B., Barnes-Holmes, Y., Barnes-Holmes, D., Stewart, I., & O’Hora, D. (2002). Relational frame theory: A new paradigm for the analysis of social behavior. The Behavior Analyst, 25, 75–91.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  171. Roche, B., & Dymond, S. (2008). A transformation of functions in accordance with the nonarbitrary relational properties of sexual stimuli. The Psychological Record, 58, 71–94.

    Google Scholar 

  172. Roche, B. T., Kanter, J. W., Brown, K. R., Dymond, S., & Fogarty, C. C. (2008). A comparison of “direct” versus “derived” extinction of avoidance responding. The Psychological Record, 58, 443–464.

    Google Scholar 

  173. Routier, C. P. (2007). Relational frame theory (RFT) and acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT): Emperor’s tailors or knights of the Holy Grail? Acta Comportamentalia, 15, 45–69.

    Google Scholar 

  174. Salzinger, K. (2003). On the verbal behavior of Relational Frame Theory: A Post-Skinnerian Account of Human Language and Cognition. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 19, 7–9.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  175. Saunders, R. R. (1996). From review to commentary on Roche and Barnes: Toward a better understanding of equivalence in the context of relational frame theory. The Psychological Record, 46, 477–487.

    Google Scholar 

  176. Sautter, R. A., & LeBlanc, L. A. (2006). The empirical applications of Skinner’s analysis of verbal behavior with humans. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 22, 35–48.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  177. Shabani, D. B., Carr, J. E., Petursdottir, A. I., Esch, B. E., & Gillet, J. N. (2004). Scholarly productivity in behavior analysis: The most prolific authors and institutions from 1992 to 2001. The Behavior Analyst Today, 5, 235–243.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  178. Sidman, M. (1994). Equivalence relations and behavior: A research story. Boston: Authors Cooperative.

    Google Scholar 

  179. Sidman, M. (2000). Equivalence relations and the reinforcement contingency. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 74, 127–146.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  180. Sidman, M. (2008). Symmetry and equivalence relations in behavior. Cognitive Studie, 15, 322–332.

    Google Scholar 

  181. Skinner, B. F. (1957). Verbal behavior. New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  182. Skinner, B. F. (1974). About behaviorism. London: Penguin.

    Google Scholar 

  183. Soriano, C. L., Martinez, O. G., & Valverde, M. R. (2005). Analyzing the verbal contexts in experiential avoidance disorder and in acceptance and commitment therapy. Re-vista Latinoamericana de Psicologia, 37, 333–358.

    Google Scholar 

  184. Spradlin, J. E. (2003). Alternative theories of the origin of derived stimulus relations. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 19, 3–6.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  185. Steele, D., & Hayes, S. C. (1991). Stimulus equivalence and arbitrarily applicable relational responding. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 56, 519–555.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  186. Stemmer, N. (1995). Do we need an alternative theory of verbal behavior?: A reply to Hayes and Wilson. The Behavior Analyst, 18, 357–362.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  187. Stewart, I., & Barnes-Holmes, D. (2001). Understanding metaphor: A relational frame perspective. The Behavior Analyst, 24, 191–199.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  188. Stewart, I., & Barnes-Holmes, D. (2004). Relational frame theory and analogical reasoning: Empirical investigations. International Journal of Psychology & Psychological Therapy, 4, 241–262.

    Google Scholar 

  189. Stewart, I., Barnes-Holmes, D., Barnes-Holmes, Y., Bond, F. W., & Hayes, S. C. (2006). Relational frame theory and industrial/organizational psychology. Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, 26, 55–90.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  190. Stewart, I., Barnes-Holmes, D., & Roche, B. (2004). A functional-analytic model of analogy using the relational evaluation procedure. The Psychological Record, 54, 531–552.

    Google Scholar 

  191. Stewart, I., Barnes-Holmes, D., Roche, B., & Smeets, P. M. (2001). Generating derived relational networks via the abstraction of common physical properties: A possible model of analogical reasoning. The Psychological Record, 51, 381–408.

    Google Scholar 

  192. Stewart, I., Barnes-Holmes, D., Roche, B., & Smeets, P. M. (2002a). A functional-analytic model of analogy: A relational frame analysis. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 78, 375–396.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  193. Stewart, I., Barnes-Holmes, D., Roche, B., & Smeets, P. M. (2002b). Stimulus equivalence and nonarbitrary relations. The Psychological Record, 52, 77–88.

    Google Scholar 

  194. Stewart, I., & McElwee, J. (2009). Relational responding and conditional discrimination procedures: An apparent inconsistency and clarification. The Behavior Analyst, 32, 309–318.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  195. Strand, P. S., Barnes-Holmes, Y., & Barnes-Holmes, D. (2003). Educating the whole child: Implications of behaviorism as a science of meaning. Journal of Behavioral Education, 12, 105–117.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  196. Tonneau, F. (2002). Who can understand relational frame theory? A reply to Barnes-Holmes and Hayes. European Journal of Behavior Analysi, 3, 95–102.

    Google Scholar 

  197. Tonneau, F. (2004). Relational Frame Theory: A Post-Skinnerian Account of Human Language and Cognition [Review]. British Journal of Psychology, 95, 265–268.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  198. Tonneau, F., Arreola, F., & Martinez, A. G. (2006). Function transformation without reinforcement. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 85, 393–405.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  199. Törneke, N., Luciano, C. M., & Salas, S. V. (2008). Rule-governed behavior and psychological problems. International Journal of Psychology & Psychological Therapy, 8, 141–156.

    Google Scholar 

  200. Viladarga, R., Hayes, S. C., Levin, M. E., & Muto, T. (2009). Creating a strategy for progress: A contextual behavioral science approach. The Behavior Analyst, 32, 105–133.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  201. Vitale, A., Barnes-Holmes, Y., Barnes-Holmes, D., & Campbell, C. (2008). Facilitating responding in accordance with the relational frame of comparison: Systematic empirical analyses. The Psychological Record, 58, 365–390.

    Google Scholar 

  202. Weinstein, J. H., Wilson, K. G., Drake, C. E., & Kellum, K. K. (2008). A relational frame theory contribution to social categorization. Behavior and Social Issue, 17, 40–65.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  203. Whelan, R., & Barnes-Holmes, D. (2004a). Empirical models of formative augmenting in accordance with the relations of same, opposite, more-than and less-than. International Journal of Psychology & Psychological Therapy, 4, 285–302.

    Google Scholar 

  204. Whelan, R., & Barnes-Holmes, D. (2004b). The transformation of consequential functions in accordance with the relational frames of same and opposite. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 82, 177–195.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  205. Whelan, R., Barnes-Holmes, D., & Dymond, S. (2006). The transformation of consequential functions in accordance with the relational frames of more-than and less-than. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 86, 317–335.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar 

  206. White, E., & Dougher, M. (2004). Criticizing the tendency for evolutionary psychologists to adopt cognitive paradigms when discussing language. International Journal of Psychology & Psychological Therapy, 4, 325–340.

    Google Scholar 

  207. Wilson, K. G., & Hayes, S. C. (2000). Why it is crucial to understand thinking and feeling: An analysis and application to drug abuse. The Behavior Analyst, 23, 25–43.

    PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  208. Wilson, K. G., O’Donohue, W. T., & Hayes, S. C. (2001). Hume’s psychology, contemporary learning theory, and the problem of knowledge amplification. New Ideas in Psychology, 19, 1–25.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  209. Winn, W. (2006). Functional contextualism in context: A reply to Fox. Educational Technology Research and Development, 54, 55–59.

    Article  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Simon Dymond.

Additional information

We thank the anonymous reviewers for their detailed and helpful comments and Dermot Barnes-Holmes for an early discussion on the potential pitfalls of citation analysis.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Dymond, S., May, R.J., Munnelly, A. et al. Evaluating the evidence base for relational frame theory: A citation analysis. BEHAV ANALYST 33, 97–117 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03392206

Download citation

Key words

  • relational frame theory
  • verbal behavior
  • citation analysis