Landau-Kleffner Syndrome and Swearing

Abstract

Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) is a rare form of epilepsy diagnosed as acquired aphasia alternatively as acquired verbal agnosia co-occurring with epileptic seizures. This article provides an overview of some relevant case studies of Landau-Kleffner patients and also some neuro-measurement studies of the neurophysiology of the disease. Recently there is no evidence whether the epileptic seizures in LKS are located in basal ganglia, limbic or subcortical circuits involved in swear words processing.

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Correspondence to Michal Korenar.

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Korenar, M. Landau-Kleffner Syndrome and Swearing. Act Nerv Super 57, 122–126 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03379944

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Key words

  • Aphasia
  • Epilepsy
  • Landau-Kleffner syndrome
  • Swearing