Electrodermal Recordings During Human Orgasm

Abstract

We tested the hypothesis that palmar sweat glands activation is expressed every time a mass sympathetic activation takes place. We performed (i) eleven palmar electrodermal recordings during sexual intercourse and orgasm of one male and one female student, (ii) 4 palmar electrodermal recordings plus heart rate during sexual intercourse and orgasm of the same couple, and (iii) 3 plantar electrodermal recordings during masturbation and ejaculation of 3 male students. High palmar electodermal activity was recorded during sexual intercourse but small during orgasm. The higher value of heart rate was recorded at the moment of orgasm. Sizeable plantar electodermal response was recorded during ejaculation after masturbation. We concluded that the palmar sweat glands activation cannot be considered as an indiscriminate following of sympathetic discharge.

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Correspondence to Stelios Kerassidis.

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Kerassidis, S. Electrodermal Recordings During Human Orgasm. Act Nerv Super 51, 147–151 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03379557

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Key words

  • Electrodermal activity
  • Orgasm
  • Sexual intercourse
  • Sympathetic nervous system