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Imaginary, but by no means unimaginable: Storytelling, science, and historical archaeology

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Abstract

“Imaginary, But by No Means Unimaginable,” a phrase coined by L. Daniel Mouer and Ywone Edwards-Ingram at the 1998 Conference on Historical and Underwater Archaeology, epitomizes a new approach to archaeological analysis and public interpretation. The suddenness with which examples of storytelling appeared in conferences and publications has left little opportunity for comment, particularly to address the theoretical and methodological issues that underlie this hybrid of science, humanities research, and artistic expression. This commentary suggests that storytelling is more than a means of engaging public audiences: it is a form of archaeological analysis.

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Gibb, J.G. Imaginary, but by no means unimaginable: Storytelling, science, and historical archaeology. Hist Arch 34, 1–6 (2000). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03374305

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03374305

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