JOM

, Volume 32, Issue 5, pp 57–64 | Cite as

Synthesis of CORONA 5 (Ti-4.5Al-5Mo-1.5Cr)

  • F. H. Froes
  • W. T. Highberger
Technical Article

Summary

The synthesis of CORONA 5 (Ti-4.5Al-5Mo-1.5Cr) is described from the viewpoints of alloy chemistry and microstructure. Lenticular alpha is shown to maximize fracture resistance parameters, while a globular alpha optimizes hightemperature flow characteristics. The processing and application of CORONA 5 as forging, plate, sheet and powder metallurgy products are presented. The weldability of the alloy is described and potential use of the alloy for engine applications discussed. The improved mechanical property behavior over the “workhorse” Ti-6Al-4V alloy combined with cost-effective production should result in use of CORONA 5 in many applications. Future developments for CORONA 5 are suggested both in terms of further mechanical property optimization and in light of the economics of producing the alloy.

Keywords

Fracture Toughness Titanium Alloy Strength Level High Fracture Toughness Alpha Phase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. H. Froes
    • 1
  • W. T. Highberger
    • 2
  1. 1.Materials LaboratoryAFWAL Wright-Patterson Air Force BaseOhio
  2. 2.Naval Air Systems CommandWashington, D.C.

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