Is being underweight associated with impairments in quality of life in the absence of significant eating disorder pathology?

Abstract

Few studies have compared low-weight individuals with eating disorder (ED) pathology with similar-weight individuals without significant pathology despite the fact that body weight is often used as a key outcome within ED research. This study compared quality of life (QoL) in one group with high levels of ED pathology to a group with low ED pathology, matched by body mass index (BMI). The high ED group reported significantly lower ED-specific quality of life (EDQoL) than the low ED group. These findings suggest that young women with high levels of ED pathology report significantly more impaired QoL than comparable young women with no ED pathology, and that being underweight alone is not a primary contributor to poorer EDQoL.

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Correspondence to Dr. P. E. Jenkins.

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Jenkins, P.E., Hoste, R.R., Conley, C.S. et al. Is being underweight associated with impairments in quality of life in the absence of significant eating disorder pathology?. Eat Weight Disord 16, e61–e64 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03327523

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Key words

  • Eating disorders
  • quality of life
  • body mass index