Advertisement

Drug Investigation

, Volume 5, Issue 1, pp 39–43 | Cite as

Onset Time for High-Dose Vecuronium after Propofol or Thiopental Anaesthesia

  • V. Vilardi
  • Maria Sanfilippo
  • G. Fierro
  • M. Traversa
  • A. Gasparetto
Original Research Article
  • 4 Downloads

Summary

The effect of bolus administration of high-dose vecuronium (0.17 mg/kg) on neuromuscular blockade in terms of onset time, duration of action and recovery rate were studied in 30 patients anaesthetised with either propofol 2 mg/kg or thiopental 5 mg/kg.

Neuromuscular block was registered by measuring mechanical responses of adductor pollicis muscle after supramaximal stimulation of the ulnar nerve at 0.1Hz and 2Hz.

The onset time was significantly shorter in patients anaesthetised with propofol than in those anaesthetised with thiopental (106 vs 156 seconds; p < 0.01). However, there was no significant difference between the 2 groups in either the duration of action of vecuronium neuromuscular blockade or the recovery rate.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Albertson TE, Tseng CC, Joy RM. Propofol modification of evoked hippocampal dentate inhibition in urethane-anesthetized rats. Anesthesiology 75: 82–90, 1991PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Baraka A, Dabbous A, Siddik S, Bijjani A. Action of propofol on resistance and capacitance vessels during cardiopulmonary bypass. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica 35: 545–547, 1991PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Barker P, Langton JA, Wilson IG, Smith G. Movements of the vocal cords on induction of anesthesia with thiopentone or propofol. British Journal of Anaesthesia 69: 23–25, 1992PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Bilbault P, Boisson-Bertrand D, Duvivier C, Paslin R, Laxenaire MC. Influence de l’association propofol-alfentanyl sur les resistances bronchiques du sujet asthmatique. Annales Francaises d’Anesthesie et de Reanimation 10: 264–268, 1991PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Borgeat A. Usefulness of propofol in torticollis. Letter. British Journal of Anaesthesia 66: 530, 1991CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Borgeat A, Dessibourg C, Rochani M, Suter PM. Sedation by propofol in tetanus — is it a muscle relaxant? Intensive Care Medicine 17: 427–429, 1991aPubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Borgeat A, Popovic V, Schwander D. Efficiency of a continuous infusion of propofol in a patient with tetanus. Critical Care Medicine 19: 295–297, 1991bPubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Borgeat A, Wildersmith OHG, Soyah M, Rifat K. Subhypnotic doses of propofol relieve pruritus induced by epidural and intrathecal morphine. Anesthesiology 76: 510–512, 1992PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Branca D, Roberti MS, Lorenzin P, Vincenti E, Scutari G. Influence of the anesthetic 2,6 diisopropilphenol on the oxidative phosphorylation of isolated rat liver mitochondria. Biochemical Pharmacology 42: 87–90, 1991PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Chang KSK, Lacy MO BS, Davis RF. Propofol produces vasodilatation by a calcium channel antagonist action. Anesthesiology 75: A553, 1991CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Concas A, Santoro G, Serra M, Sanna E, Biggio G. Neurochemical action of the general anaesthetic propofol on the chloride ion channel coupled with GABAA receptors. Brain Research 542: 225–232, 1991PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. De Riu PL, Petruzzi V, Testa C, Mulas M, Mels F, et al. Propofol anticonvulsant activity in experimental epileptic status. British Journal of Anaesthesia 69: 177–181, 1992PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Ebert TJ, Muzi M, Berens M, Goff D, Kampine JP. Sympathetic responses to induction of anesthesia in humans with propofol or etomidate. Anesthesiology 76: 725–733, 1992PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Eriksson C. Effects of the general anesthetic propofol on the Ca 2+ induced permeabilization of rat liver mitochondria. FEBS Letters 279: 45–48, 1991PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Feldman S, Fauvel N, Harrop-Griffith W. The onset of neuromuscular blockade. In Bowman et al. (Eds) Neuromuscular blocking agents: past, present, future, pp. 44–51, Excerpta Medica, Amsterdam, 1990Google Scholar
  16. Frenkel C, Urban BW. Human brain sodium channels as one of the molecular target sites for the new intravenous anaesthetic propofol (2, 6 diisopropilphenol). European Journal of Pharmacology — Molecular Pharmacology Section 208: 75–79, 1991PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Gramstad L, Lilleaasen P, Minsaas B. Onset time for alcuronium and pancuronium after Cremophor-containing anaesthetics. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica 25: 484–486, 1981PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Grounds RM, Twigley AJ, Carli F, Whitwam JG, Morgan M. The hemodynamic effect of intravenous induction comparison of the effect of thiopentone and propofol. Anaesthesia 40: 735–740, 1985PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Hales TG, Lambert JJ. Modulation of the GABAA receptor by propofol: protein or lipid interaction? Anesthesiology 75: A587, 1991CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Hovorka J, Honkavaara P, Korttila K. Tracheal intubation after induction of anaesthesia with thiopentone or propofol without muscle relaxants. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica 35: 326–328, 1991PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Kallar SK. Propofol allows intubation without relaxants. Anesthesiology 73: A22, 1990CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Keaveny JP, Knell PJ. Intubation under induction doses of propofol. Anesthesia 3 (Suppl.): 80–81, 1988CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Kon Park W, Lynch C III. Propofol and thiopental depression of myocardial contractility. A comparative study of mechanical and electrophysiologic effects in isolated guinea pig ventricular muscle. Anesthesia and Analgesia 74: 395–405, 1992Google Scholar
  24. Kothary SP, Pandit SK, Lebenbom-Mansour M, Levy L, Randel GI. Tracheal intubation after propofol anesthesia without neuromuscular blocker is not practical. Anesthesiology 75: allll, 1991CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Kumar A, Lee TL, Adaikan PG, Lau RC, Ratnam SS. Effect of propofol on guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle. Anesthesiology 71: A280, 1989CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Lebeda MD, Wegrzynowicz ES, Wachtel RE. Propofol potentiates both pre- and postsynaptic effects of vecuronium in the rat hemidiaphragm. British Journal of Anaesthesia 68: 282–285, 1992PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Lippmann M, Paicius RM, Gingerich S, Owens R, Mok MS, et al. A controlled study of the hemodynamic effects of propofol versus thiopental during anesthesia induction. Seminars in Anesthesia VII: 116–122, 1988Google Scholar
  28. Musacchio E, Rizzoli V, Bianchi M, Bindoli A, Galzigma L. Antioxidant action of propofol on liver microsomes, mitochondria and brain synaptosomes in the rat. Pharmacology and Toxicology 69: 75–77, 1991PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Nakamura K, Hatano Y, Hirakata H, Nishiwada M, Toda H, et al. Direct vasoconstrictor and vasodilator effects of propofol in isolated dog arteries. British Journal of Anaesthesia 68: 193–197, 1992PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Ozhan M, Sill JC, Katusic Z, Rorie D, Uhl C. Propofol, thiopental and contractile responses in isolated pig coronary arteries and cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. Anesthesiology 73: A583, 1990CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Peduto VA, Concas A, Santoro G, Biggio G, Gessa GL. Biochemical and electrophysiologic evidence that propofol enhances GABAergic transmission in the rat brain. Anesthesiology 75: 1000–1009, 1991PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Rotzler S, Schramek H, Brenner HR. Metabolic stabilization of endplate Ach receptor regulated by Ca influx associated with muscle activity. Nature 349: 337–339, 1991PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Stanski DR, Watkins WD. Drug disposition in anesthesia, pp. 106–108, Grune and Stratton, New York, 1982Google Scholar
  34. Streisand JB, Stanley TH. The respiratory effects of Dipravan (propofol) with and without fentanyl. Seminars in Anesthesia VII(Suppl. 1): 123–126, 1988Google Scholar
  35. Urban BW, Frenkel C, Duch DS, Kauff AB. Molecular models of anesthetic action on sodium channels, including those from human brain. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 625: 327–343, 1991PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Wali FA. Effects of some intravenous anaesthetics on the contractile responses produced in the chick biventer cervicis skeletal muscle. Pharmacological Research Communications 17: 361–346, 1985PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Adis International Limited 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. Vilardi
    • 1
  • Maria Sanfilippo
    • 2
  • G. Fierro
    • 2
  • M. Traversa
    • 2
  • A. Gasparetto
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of General Anaesthesia and Special Odontostomatologic AnaesthesiaState UniversityL’AquilaItaly
  2. 2.Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive CareState University ‘La Sapienza’RomeItaly

Personalised recommendations