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Astaxanthin

To delay skin aging

Summary

Oxidative stress caused by UV-light, smoking and pollution has been explained to have a major impact in the process of skin aging. Free radicals damage skin cells and destroy the collagen network which leads to sagging and wrinkles. The interest of astaxanthin as an anti-wrinkle agent is growing among researches due to its natural capacity to protect cells from irradiation and oxidation. Astaxanthin is produced by the alga Haematococcus pluvialis to protect its cells from sun radiation, UV-light and oxidation. Several human studies demonstrated that astaxanthin reduced wrinkles and improved skin elasticity and moisture. The results are confirmed by animal studies. The mechanism of action of astaxanthin is explained by its strong antioxidant capacity and its protective effects against sun irradiation. In vitro studies have demonstrated that astaxanthin improves the function of mitochondria and has good protective effects on human fibroblasts. In that way, it can protect skin cells from free radicals and preserve the collagen layer which result in smooth and youthful appearance of the skin. The results indicate that astaxanthin has promising anti-wrinkle effects and that it can be helpful in reducing the skin aging process.

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Correspondence to Petra J Kindlund.

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Kindlund, P.J. Astaxanthin. Nutrafoods 10, 27–31 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03223352

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03223352

Key words

  • Astaxanthin
  • Haematococcus pluvialis
  • Carotenoids
  • Antioxidant
  • Anti-wrinkles