Gold Bulletin

, Volume 40, Issue 4, pp 270–277 | Cite as

The Lycurgus Cup — A Roman nanotechnology

  • Ian Freestone
  • Nigel Meeks
  • Margaret Sax
  • Catherine Higgitt
Open Access
Scientific Papers

References

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Copyright information

© World Gold Council 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ian Freestone
    • 1
  • Nigel Meeks
    • 2
  • Margaret Sax
    • 2
  • Catherine Higgitt
    • 2
  1. 1.Cardiff School of History and ArchaeologyCardiff UniversityCardiffWales UK
  2. 2.Department of Conservation, Documentation and ScienceThe British MuseumLondonUK

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