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Acta Theriologica

, Volume 49, Issue 3, pp 427–432 | Cite as

Early primiparity in brown bears

  • Andreas Zedrosser
  • Georg Rauer
  • Luise Kruckenhauser
Fragmenta Theriologica

Abstract

We documented 2 cases of unusually early primiparity in brown bearsUrsus arctos Linneaus, 1758 in an introduced population in central Austria. Two females gave birth at the age of 3 years.

Key words

Ursus arctos primiparity reproduction 

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Copyright information

© Mammal Research Institute, Bialowieza, Poland 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andreas Zedrosser
    • 1
    • 2
  • Georg Rauer
    • 3
  • Luise Kruckenhauser
    • 4
  1. 1.Institute for Wildlife Biology and Game ManagementAgricultural University of ViennaVienna
  2. 2.Department for Ecology and Natural Resource ManagementAgricultural University of NorwayNorway
  3. 3.World Wide Fund for Nature, AustriaViennaAustria
  4. 4.Laboratory of Molecular SystematicsMuseum of Natural History ViennaViennaAustria

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