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Kind en adolescent

, 17:93 | Cite as

Problemen in de sociale interactie en communicatie bij kinderen met een aan autisme verwante stoornis

Hypothesen en onderzoek
  • M. Serra
  • R. B. Minderaa
Article
  • 2k Downloads

Samenvatting

Centraal staat de hypothese dat kinderen met aan autisme verwante stoornissen moeite hebben met het toeschrijven van zogenaamde ‘mental states’ (bijvoorbeeld gedachten, intenties of wensen) aan zichzelf en anderen (‘theory of mind’–hypothese). Er wordt een overzicht gegeven van onderzoeksresultaten met betrekking tot theory of mind–vaardigheden bij kinderen met autisme en aan autisme verwante stoornissen. In hoeverre moeten theory of mind–problemen ook bij deze laatste groep kinderen als centraal, onderliggend probleem worden gezien? Alternatieve verklaringen voor de sociale en communicatieve problemen van kinderen met aan autisme verwante stoornissen worden besproken, gevolgd door suggesties voor verder onderzoek.

pervasive developmental disorders Theory of Mind. 

Notes

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Copyright information

© Bohn Stafleu van Loghum 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Serra
    • 1
  • R. B. Minderaa
    • 1
  1. 1.

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