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Lateralisatie en leerproblemen: de doolhof van Minos

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Kind en adolescent

Samenvatting

In dit artikel wordt het verband tussen leerproblemen en lateralisatie nader toegelicht. De term ‘lateralisatie’ blijkt vele ladingen te dekken. We kunnen verschillende niveaus onderscheiden: 1. lateralisatie in het gedrag, 2. het cognitief niveau, 3. functionele en 4. structurele asymmetrieën. Nadat de literatuurgegevens over deze verschillende niveaus werden nagegaan kom ik tot de conclusie dat de onderzoeken vaak tegenstrijdige resultaten opleveren en dikwijls lijden aan methodologische problemen. Verder blijkt dat ‘lateralisatietheorieën’ te vaag zijn en te weinig gebaseerd op een grondige empirische bewijsvoering. Dit heeft implicaties voor de behandeling van kinderen met leerproblemen.

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Summary

In this article I discuss the relationship between learning disabilities and lateralisation. The term ‘lateralisation’ would seem to have several meanings. We can distinguish a number of levels: 1. lateralisation in behaviour, 2. the cognitive level, 3. functional and 4. structural asymmetries. Following a review of the literature on these levels, I come to the conclusion that research yields contradictory results and often suffers from methodological problems. It seems, furthermore, that many ‘lateralisation theories’ are too vague and are not sufficiently based on thorough empirical argumentation. This has implications for treating children with learning disabilities.

Drs. J. Cracco is orthopedagoog en werkzaam als teamcoördinator bij kinderen met leerproblemen in het Centrum voor Gehoorrevalidatie en Logopedie te Kortrijk.

Contactadres: Centrum voor Gehoorrevalidatie en Logopedie, Overleiestraat 57, B–8500 Kortrijk.

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Cracco, J. Lateralisatie en leerproblemen: de doolhof van Minos. KIAD 13, 45–55 (1992). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03060452

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