The American Journal of Digestive Diseases

, Volume 7, Issue 9, pp 365–373 | Cite as

The body build of the male ulcer patient

  • S. C. Robinson
  • Marshall Brucer
Article

Conclusions

  1. 1.

    The gross measures of body build, weight, and blood pressure in 250 men with gastro-duodenal ulcer as proved by X-ray and history are compared with a control group of 7478 men.

     
  2. 2.

    The ulcer patient was found to differ from the control group in every measure studied except height.

     
  3. 3.

    The ulcer patient tends to be normal or underweight. He is seldom overweight.

     
  4. 4.

    The chest circumference of the ulcer patient tends to be much smaller than is found in an unselected population. Only rarely does a person with a large chest have an ulcer.

     
  5. 5.

    The abdomen circumference at the level of the umbilicus is smaller in the ulcer than in the unselected groups.

     
  6. 6.

    The body build as measured by the chest :height index shows that the ulcer patient usually has a slender, narrow or linear type build. He is seldom of the broad-chested or lateral build and almost never extremely lateral.

     
  7. 7.

    The chest:abdomen index shows that the ulcer patient, more so than in the unselected group, has little tendency to develop abdominal protrusion. His abdomen is smaller than his chest.

     

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1940

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. C. Robinson
    • 1
  • Marshall Brucer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MedicineNorthwestern UniversityChicago

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