Skip to main content

Use of a selective medium to study the dispersal of ascospores ofSclerotinia sclerotiorum

Abstract

A selective medium (potato dextrose agar with pentachloronitrobenzene and streptomycin) was used to assess dispersal of ascospores ofSclerotinia sclerotiorum in the field. This medium inhibited development ofMucor spp. andRhizopus spp. without affecting the germinability ofS. sclerotiorum ascospores or the production of sclerotia. The number of viable ascospores started increasing in December, was maximal from January to February, and decreased sharply in March. Deposition of ascospores on plates was maximal (57%) between 10:00 and 13:00 hours. Seventy-seven to 90% of the ascospores were deposited within the first 100 m from the source of inoculum and the rest were transported farther.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

References

  1. Abawi, G.S. and Grogan, R.G. (1979) Epidemiology of diseases caused bySclerotinia species.Phytopathology 69:899–904.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  2. Ben-Yephet, Y., Bitton, S., Mor, N., Keren, Y. and Greenberger, A. (1983) Control ofSclerotinia sclerotiorum by soil disinfestation with metham-sodium and by aerial application of benomyl.Phytoparasitica 11:207 (abstr.).

    Google Scholar 

  3. Brown, J.G. and Butler, K.D. (1936) Sclerotiniose of lettuce in Arizona.Tech. Bull. Ariz. Agric. Exp. Stn 63:475–506.

    Google Scholar 

  4. Gregory, P.H. (1952) Fungus spores.Trans. Br. mycol. Soc. 35:1–18.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  5. Hartill, W.F.T. (1980) Aerobiology ofSclerotinia sclerotiorum andBotrytis cinerea spores in New Zealand tobacco crops.N.Z. Jl agric. Res. 23:259–262.

    Google Scholar 

  6. Kritzman, G. (1983) Studies on the fungicidal control of bulb rot caused byBotrytis allii in onions for the production of seeds.J. agric. Sci., Camb. 100:519–525.

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  7. Kritzman, G. and Netzer, D. (1978) A selective medium for isolation and identification ofBotrytis spp. from soil and onion seed.Phytoparasitica 6:3–7.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  8. Palti, J. (1963)Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in Israel.Phytopath. medit. 2:640–645.

    Google Scholar 

  9. Steadman, J.R. (1982) Research on the epidemiology and control ofSclerotinia disease in the U.S.A. with emphasis on white mould of bean.Proc. Australian Workshop on Sclerotinia Diseases and their Control (Newtown, Tasmania), pp. 16–19.

  10. Suzui, T. and Kobayashi, T. (1972) Dispersal of ascospores ofSclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary on kidney bean plants. Part 1. Dispersal of ascospores from a point source of apothecia.Res. Bull. Hokkaido Natn. Agric. Exp. Stn 101:137–151. (Japanese, with English summary)

    Google Scholar 

  11. Suzui, T. and Kobayashi, T. (1972) Disperal of ascospores ofSclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary on kidney bean plants. Part 2. Dispersal of ascospores in the Tokachi District, Hokkaido.Res. Bull. Hokkaido Natn. Agric. Exp. Stn 102:61–68. (Japanese, with English summary)

    Google Scholar 

  12. Vigodsky, H. (1969) Methods for controllingSclerotinia rot of gerbera and studies on the disease cycle in Israel.Israel J. agric. Res. 19:185–194.

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  13. Williams, J.R. and Stelfox, D. (1979) Dispersal of ascospores ofSclerotinia sclerotiorum in relation to sclerotinia stem rot of rapeseed.Pl. Dis. Reptr 63:395–399.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Ben-Yephet, Y., Bitton, S. Use of a selective medium to study the dispersal of ascospores ofSclerotinia sclerotiorum . Phytoparasitica 13, 33 (1985). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02994435

Download citation

  • Received:

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02994435

Key words

  • Sclerotia
  • apothecia
  • pentachloronitrobenzene
  • Mucor spp.
  • Rhizopus spp.