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Collection, preservation and utilization of indigenous strains of maize

Abstract

The seed of more than 12,000 variations of Indian corn have been collected from many areas in the Western Hemisphere, and are preserved at regional centers to provide genetic factors in the future breeding of agronomically improved, disease-resistant and higher yielding varieties.

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Literature Cited

  1. Brown, W. L. Maize of the West Indies. Trap. Agr.30 (7–9): 141–170. Illus. 1953.

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  2. Clark, J. A. Preventing extinction of original strains of corn. Nat. Acad. Sci., Nat. Res. Coun. News Rep.4 (5). 1954.

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  3. Report of the Maize Committee. Collections of original strains of corn. I. Nat. Acad. Sci., Nat. Res. Coun. [Processed]. 314 pp. 1954.

  4. Wellhausen, E. J., Roberts, L. M., Hernandez. X. E., and Mangelsdorf. P. C. Races of maize in Mexico, their origin, characteristics, and distribution. 223 pp. Illus. Bussey Inst. Harvard Univ. 1952.

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Clark, J.A. Collection, preservation and utilization of indigenous strains of maize. Econ Bot 10, 194–200 (1956). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02985328

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02985328

Keywords

  • Corn
  • Economic Botany
  • Colombia
  • Western Hemisphere
  • Germ Plasm