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International Journal of Hematology

, Volume 78, Issue 3, pp 241–247 | Cite as

Relation of In Vitro Growth Characteristics to Cytogenetics and Treatment Outcome in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Prognostic Significance in Patients with a Normal Karyotype

  • Andrea Berer
  • Birgit Kainz
  • Ulrich Jäger
  • Eva Jäger
  • Susanna Stengg
  • Berthold Streubel
  • Christa Fonatsch
  • Gerlinde Mitterbauer
  • Klaus Lechner
  • Klaus Geissler
  • Leopold Öhler
Progress in Hematology

Abstract

We analyzed in vitro growth characteristics of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) from 322 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in relation to cytogenetic abnormalities. Median colony growth was low in each of the cytogenetic changes associated with a favorable outcome. Most karyotypic abnormalities in the intermediate prognosis group were associated with low growth potential, but 11q23 abnormalities exhibited 8 times higher in vitro growth. Cytogenetic changes that included abn(3q) seemed to display the highest colony growth in the unfavorable prognosis group, whereas isolated -7 may have been associated with limited growth potential. In vitro growth behavior was predictive of neither rate of complete remission (CR) nor survival of AML patients within the 3 cytogenetic risk groups. In contrast, colony growth differed significantly in the subgroup of patients with a normal karyotype who achieved remission with induction treatment and those who had no remission (10 versus 81.5/105 BMMCs;P = .015). Significantly more patients with normal cytogenetics and colony growth below the 50th percentile went into CR than did patients with colony growth above the 50th percentile (82.8% versus 71.2%). Only 4 (6.8%) of the patients in the low growth group had no remission, compared with 12 (23.1%) of the patients with higher in vitro growth (P = .031, chi-square test). In conclusion, colony growth may prove useful as a prognostic factor for early treatment failure in AML patients with a normal karyotype.Int J Hematol. 2003;78:241-247.

Key words

AML Colony growth Cytogenetics Treatment response Survival 

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Hematology 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrea Berer
    • 1
  • Birgit Kainz
    • 1
  • Ulrich Jäger
    • 1
  • Eva Jäger
    • 1
  • Susanna Stengg
    • 1
  • Berthold Streubel
    • 2
  • Christa Fonatsch
    • 2
  • Gerlinde Mitterbauer
    • 3
  • Klaus Lechner
    • 1
  • Klaus Geissler
    • 4
  • Leopold Öhler
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Internal Medicine I, Division of HematologyUniversity of ViennaViennaAustria
  2. 2.Institute of Medical BiologyUniversity of ViennaAustria
  3. 3.Department of Laboratory Medicine, Division of Molecular BiologyUniversity of ViennaAustria
  4. 4.Fifth Medical Department-OncologyHospital LainzViennaAustria

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