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International Journal of Hematology

, Volume 75, Issue 4, pp 421–425 | Cite as

Human Herpesvirus 6 Meningoencephalitis Successfully Treated with Ganciclovir in a Patient Who Underwent Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation from an HLA-Identical Sibling

  • Hitoshi Yoshida
  • Kazumi Matsunaga
  • Takeshi Ueda
  • Masato Yasumi
  • Jun Ishikawa
  • Yoshiaki Tomiyama
  • Yuji Matsuzawa
Case Report

Abstract

Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) has recently been recognized as an important pathogen in immunocompromised hosts, such as patients who have undergone allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT). Here we report a case of HHV-6 menin-goencephalitis in a patient who underwent allo-BMT from an HLA-identical sibling.The patient suffered from headache, high fever, tremor, and disorientation on day 35 after allo-BMT. Findings at magnetic resonance imaging, electroencephalography, and routine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination suggested the presence of viral meningoencephalitis.We diagnosed HHV-6 meningoencephalitis by means of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of a CSF specimen. Successful treatment was achieved with ganciclovir. Because HHV-6 encephalitis has a potentially fatal and fulminant course, it is necessary that HHV-6 encephalitis be recognized as one of the central nervous system complications that can follow allo-BMT. PCR analysis for HHV-6 in the CSF specimen is necessary for appropriate diagnosis and treatment.

Key words

HHV-6 Meningoencephalitis Allogeneic BMT Ganciclovir 

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Hematology 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hitoshi Yoshida
    • 1
  • Kazumi Matsunaga
    • 1
  • Takeshi Ueda
    • 1
  • Masato Yasumi
    • 1
  • Jun Ishikawa
    • 1
  • Yoshiaki Tomiyama
    • 1
  • Yuji Matsuzawa
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Internal Medicine and Molecular ScienceGraduate School of MedicineYamada-oka, Suita, OsakaJapan

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