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International Journal of Hematology

, Volume 73, Issue 3, pp 323–326 | Cite as

Quantitative Monitoring of Circulating Epstein-Barr Virus DNA for Predicting the Development of Posttransplantation Lymphoproliferative Disease

  • Shouichi Ohga
  • Eiji Kubo
  • Akihiko Nomura
  • Hidetoshi Takada
  • Naohiro Suga
  • Eiichi Ishii
  • Aiko Suminoe
  • Takeshi Inamitsu
  • Akinobu Matsuzaki
  • Naoki Kasuga
  • Toshiro Haraa
Rapid Communication

Abstract

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-DNA was quantitatively measured to assess posttransplantation virus reactivation by realtime polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In the first retrospective analysis of a 7-year-old boy with lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) after an unrelated cord blood transplantation, serum EBV-DNA progressively increased to 4 x 105 copies/mL. EBV load was then prospectively monitored in peripheral blood from posttransplantation patients. The second case was an 8 year-old boy with aplastic anemia who received a CD34+ cell transplantation. This patient died of LPD with the progression of pulmonary nodules. EBV-DNA increased to 4 x 104 copies/mL after the control of cytomegalovirus reactivation. On the other hand, EBV-DNA was undetectable (<200 copies/mL) in the series of all 58 samples from 10 patients who did not develop LPD after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Sequential monitoring of circulating EBV-DNA by quantitative PCR may be a useful indicator for predicting the development of posttransplantation LPD.

Key words

Real-time polymerase chain reaction Lymphoproliferative disease Epstein-Barr virus 

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Hematology 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shouichi Ohga
    • 1
  • Eiji Kubo
    • 1
  • Akihiko Nomura
    • 1
  • Hidetoshi Takada
    • 1
  • Naohiro Suga
    • 1
  • Eiichi Ishii
    • 1
    • 2
  • Aiko Suminoe
    • 1
  • Takeshi Inamitsu
    • 1
  • Akinobu Matsuzaki
    • 1
  • Naoki Kasuga
    • 3
  • Toshiro Haraa
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsGraduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu UniversityFukuokaJapan
  2. 2.Division of PediatricsHamanomachi HospitalFukuokaJapan
  3. 3.Otsuka Assay LaboratoriesOtsuka PharmaceuticalTokyoJapan

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