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International Journal of Hematology

, Volume 73, Issue 2, pp 226–229 | Cite as

T-Cell Type Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Following Cyclosporin A Therapy for Aplastic Anemia

  • Yuko Hirose
  • Yasufumi Masaki
  • Kazumi Ebata
  • Jun Okada
  • Chang gi Kim
  • Noriyoshi Ogawa
  • Yuji Wano
  • Susumu Sugai
Case Report

Abstract

Cyclosporin A (CsA) is used to prevent rejection in transplantation and to treat autoimmune and hematologic diseases such as aplastic anemia. However, the tumor growth-promoting effect of CsA remains controversial. We report the case of a 24-year-old man who developed acute lymphoblastic leukemia of precursor-T-cell origin after 75 months of treatment with CsA for aplastic anemia. The surface antigen phenotype of his leukemic cells was CD2+, CD3+, CD5+, CD7+, CD4, CD8, CD10, CD20, CD34, CD41, and CD56. Southern blot analysis revealed a monoclonal rearrangement of T-cell receptor—J nongermline fragments inHindIII digestion.

Key words

T-ALL Cyclosporin A Aplastic anemia 

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Hematology 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yuko Hirose
    • 1
  • Yasufumi Masaki
    • 1
  • Kazumi Ebata
    • 1
  • Jun Okada
    • 1
  • Chang gi Kim
    • 1
  • Noriyoshi Ogawa
    • 1
  • Yuji Wano
    • 1
  • Susumu Sugai
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Hematology and Immunology, Department of Internal MedicineKanazawa Medical UniversityIshikawaJapan

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