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Biological and molecular characterization of Tomato spotted wilt Virus in Israel

Abstract

Received April 24, 1997; received in final form June 29, 1997. Symptoms resembling tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) infections were documented among ornamental and vegetable crops in commercial greenhouses and open fields in Israel. Plants exhibiting these symptoms were collected from January 1992 to December 1996. Among cultivated plants analyzed for TSWV by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), 19 species representing five families were found to be infected; natural infection was also recorded in six plant species of weeds. Virus identity was characterized by host range, serology and electron microscopy. Serological reaction with the isolates, found in Israel, using antisera from different sources as well as the sequence analysis of the nucleocapsid gene, demonstrated that the Israeli isolates of TSWV are a member of tospovirus serogroup I, type I (BR-01 strain). No virus transmission was found in seeds collected from virus-infected vegetable and ornamental crops. A non-radioactive molecular probe derived from the cloned nucleocapsid isolate enables specific detection of the virus in crude sap from infected plants. The detection of TSWV in Israel constitutes a severe potential threat to the ornamental and vegetable industry.

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Correspondence to A. Gera.

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Antignus, Y., Lapidot, M., Ganaim, N. et al. Biological and molecular characterization of Tomato spotted wilt Virus in Israel. Phytoparasitica 25, 319–330 (1997). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02981095

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02981095

Key words

  • Tomato spotted wilt virus
  • tospovirus
  • serology
  • host range
  • biology
  • riboprobe
  • sequence
  • seed transmission
  • ELISA