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Inhibition of angiogenesis by propolis

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Abstract

Propolis, obtained from honeybee hives, has been used in Oriental folk medicine as an antiinflammatory, anti-carcinogenic, and immunomodulatory agent. There is considerable evidence suggesting that angiogenesis and chronic inflammation are codependent. Blockage of angiogenesis results in an anti-inflammatory effect. Ethanol (EEP) and ether extracts of propolis (REP), and caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), an active component of propolis, were examined for their anti-angiogenic activities using the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), and the calf pulmonary arterial endothelial (CPAE) cell proliferation, assays. The presence of EEP, REP and CAPE inhibited angiogenesis in the CAM assay and the proliferation of CPAE cells. The results suggest that anti-angiogenic activities of EEP, REP and CAPE are also responsible for their anti-inflammatory effect.

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Correspondence to Changbae Jin.

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Song, Y.S., Park, EH., Jung, K.J. et al. Inhibition of angiogenesis by propolis. Arch Pharm Res 25, 500–504 (2002). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02976609

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02976609

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