The impact of computers on learning: Research on in-school and out-of-school settings

Abstract

THIS REPORT PROVIDES AN OVERVIEW of the literature on the influence of computers on learning in formal classroom and informal out-of-school contexts. Following these overviews, the authors turn to a consideration of the primary policy considerations related to the diffusion of computer technology. The report concludes with the suggestion that through technology traditional boundaries between home and school, between formal- and informal-learning contexts, can be overcome. This process of extending learning experiences beyond the traditional classroom would expand opportunities for workforce development and provide alternatives for an educational system stretched to its limits.

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Kathy A. Krendl is an Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Tele-communications at Indiana University. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1982. Her research interest focus on learning outcomes related to media applications in both formal classroom and out-of-school contexts. She has served as a Visiting Scholar at Children’s Television Workshop and has consulted with a number of other organizations interested in the use of media in educating the public.

Ginger Clark is an Assistant Professor at Texas Christian University. She received her Ph.D. from the Department of Telecommunications at Indiana University in 1992.

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Krendl, K.A., Clark, G. The impact of computers on learning: Research on in-school and out-of-school settings. J. Comput. High. Educ. 5, 85–112 (1994). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02948572

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Keywords

  • impact of computers
  • access to computers
  • policy
  • lifelong learning
  • electronic technology