Intereconomics

, Volume 32, Issue 5, pp 225–229 | Cite as

Reasons for regional integration agreements

  • Peter Moser
International Trade
  • 755 Downloads

Abstract

Regional integration agreements are commonplace in the world today. In 1996 there were 88 such agreements worldwide, covering a variety of forms from declarations of intent to unilateral preferential trade agreements, free trade treaties, customs unions, and the common market with its freedom of movement for labour and capital. Which factors have contributed to the great popularity of regional integration agreements?

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Copyright information

© HWWA and Springer-Verlag 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Moser
    • 1
  1. 1.Business School of Chur Samedan and University of St. GallenSwitzerland

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