Balance of trade and government intervention — Japan as a role model?

Abstract

Japan's industrial and trade policies are often seen as the reason for high Japanese balance of trade surpluses. Does this theory stand up to a close examination of the relationships between balance of trade, trade policy and structural change?

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References

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Correspondence to Gunther Schnabl.

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Schnabl, G. Balance of trade and government intervention — Japan as a role model?. Intereconomics 31, 189–196 (1996). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02928602

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Keywords

  • Foreign Exchange
  • Trade Policy
  • Trade Barrier
  • Trade Deficit
  • Trade Surplus