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Intereconomics

, Volume 16, Issue 3, pp 126–129 | Cite as

Inward-oriented development — An alternative strategy for the Third World

  • Urs Heierli
Articles Development Strategy
  • 30 Downloads

Abstract

Both free trade and protectionism have been proffered as prescriptions for Third World development but neither has carried universal conviction. Neither import substitution nor export promotion strategies have come up to expectations. The author advocates a limited measure of delinking from the world market combined with inward-oriented technology adaptation.

Keywords

Free Trade Import Substitution Trade Regime Traditional Sector Modern Sector 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    Cf. David Ricardo: An Essay on the Influence of a Low Price of Corn on the Profits of Stock, in: P. Sraffa (ed.): The Works and Correspondence of David Ricardo, Vol. IV, Pamphlets 1815–1823, Cambridge 1951, p. 5 ff.Google Scholar
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    Cf. Friedrich List: Das nationale System der politischen Ökonomie (The national system of political economy), Jena 1922.Google Scholar
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    Cf. Carlos F. Diaz-Alejandro: Foreign Trade Regimes and Economic Development: Colombia, National Bureau of Economic Research, New York 1976, p. 240 ff.Google Scholar
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    Cf. John E. Todd: Efficiency and Plant Size in Colombian Manufacturing, Ph. D. thesis, Yale University 1972.Google Scholar
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    Cf. Carlos F. Diaz-Alejandro: op. cit., Los Mecanismos de Control de Importaciones—El Sistema durante 1971 y un Recuento de su Evolucion (The mechanisms of import control—the system in 1971 and a review of its evolution), Fedesarrollo, Bogotá 1971 (2 parts). p. 102.Google Scholar
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    Cf. Carlos F. Diaz-Alejandro: Los Mecanismos de Control de Importaciones—El Sistema durante 1971 y un Recuento de su Evolucion (The mechanisms of import control—the system in 1971 and a review of its evolution), Fedesarrollo, Bogotá 1971 (2 parts).Google Scholar
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    Cf. Thomas L. Hutcheson, Daniel H. Schydlowsky: Incentives for Industrialization in Colombia, World Bank paper on a research project under the direction of Bela Balassa, as yet unpublished, Washington 1977, p. 2–20.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Cf. Wayne R. Thirsk: The Economics of Colombian Farm Mechanization, Ph. D. thesis, Yale University 1972.Google Scholar
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    Cf. David Morawetz: Import-Substitution, Employment and Foreign Exchange in Columbia: No Cheers for Petrochemicals, in: Peter Timmer et al.: The Choice of Technology in Developing Countries, Harvard Studies in International Affairs, No. 32, Cambridge (Mass.) 1975, p. 95 ff.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© HWWA and Springer-Verlag 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Urs Heierli
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Latin America Research and Development CooperationSt. Gall UniversitySt. Gall

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