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Transferring the technology, policy, and management concept from the Netherlands to China

Abstract

The literature on policy transfer between countries and organization has seen rapid growth. Whether framed in terms of policy transfer, institutional transplantation, imitation and emulation or copying policy models and ideas, a sizeable number of determinants for success have been identified to understand why such conceptual or institutional transfers grow out to become successes or failures in their countries or organizations of adoption. What is much less common is to describe such a process through the lens of participants inside this transfer. This paper is an attempt to do just that. It will tell the story of the higher-educational concept of Technology, Policy and Management from Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands to Harbin Institute of Technology in China, studied by means of participatory observation. The keys and clues for successful transplantation from the literature will subsequently be compared with the experiences from this case, and additional lessons, some of which are specific to Western-Chinese mutual learning, are formulated.

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Authors

Additional information

Martin de Jong is associate professor of policy, organization and management at the Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management of Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands. He publishes and lectures mainly on subjects of cross-national policy transfer, cross-cultural management and transport infrastructure policy. He is also responsible for the international master program Engineering and Policy Analysis, for which he has helped to set up a Chinese counterpart with the same name.

Xi Bao is professor of public management and real estate management at the School of Management and the National Centre of Technology, Policy and Management of Harbin Institute of Technology, People’s Republic of China. He is also a co-director of the National Centre of TPM in China and lectures and publishes mainly on real estate management and infrastructure policy.

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de Jong, M., Bao, X. Transferring the technology, policy, and management concept from the Netherlands to China. Know Techn Pol 19, 119–136 (2007). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02914894

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02914894

Keywords

  • World Scientific
  • Policy Transfer
  • Academic Entrepreneur
  • Collaboration Agreement
  • Double Degree