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Journal of the American Oil Chemists’ Society

, Volume 56, Issue 9, pp 784–788 | Cite as

The three eras of fungal toxin research

  • Leonard Stoloff
Symposium: Mycotoxins I and II

Abstract

The era of moldy food or feed toxicoses dates from 1711 when the role of the fungusClaviceps purpurea in the formation of the poisonous ergot grains on rye was established. Since that time numerous toxic incidents have been related to ingestion of moldy food or feed. The thrust of the research through this period was to isolate and identify the responsible mold(s). We are now well into the mycotoxin era, which dates from 1962 with the isolation and characterization of the aflatoxins. The absence of viable mold in the toxic peanut meal that sparked this era provides a suitable backdrop for the current research activity with isolated, well identified toxins of mold origin. We now have identified toxins with no obvious disease relationship. This brings us to the third era, the era of multiple challenges just getting under way. Since some of the first era toxicoses cannot be explained on the basis of the isolated toxins alone, we are beginning to realize that multiple factors may be involved.

Keywords

Mold Aflatoxin Trichothecene Zearalenone Citrinin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The American Oil Chemists’ Society 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leonard Stoloff
    • 1
  1. 1.Bureau of FoodsU.S. Food and Drug AdministrationWashington, DC

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