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Coping and psychological distress for men with substance use disorders

Abstract

Coping with stress is a major focus for chemically dependent persons in relapse prevention programs. The relationships among coping and psychological distress were investigated in 71 men with substance use disorders, at both pre—and post-treatment. It was predicted that low task-oriented coping, high emotion-oriented coping, and high avoidance-oriented coping would predict psychological distress (e.g., anxiety and depression). It was also expected that use of task-oriented coping would increase following treatment and that use of emotion-oriented coping and avoidance-oriented coping, and reported levels of psychological distress would all decrease following treatment. Participants completed the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations and the General Health Questionnaire, took part in an intensive treatment program (e.g., relaxation, drug education, stress management) and completed these questionnaires again following treatment. Results indicated that high emotion-oriented coping predicted hypochondriasis, anxiety and depression. Task-oriented and avoidance-oriented coping did not predict psychological distress, although task-oriented coping was negatively related to hypochondriasis, anxiety and depression. The results regarding change in coping styles and levels of psychological distress were as hypothesized, except that avoidance-oriented coping did not significantly change following treatment. Theoretical and practical implications of the research are discussed.

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Christine, M.A.C., Norman, S.E. & Nancy, L.K. Coping and psychological distress for men with substance use disorders. Curr Psychol 21, 35–49 (2002). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02903158

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Keywords

  • Psychological Distress
  • Coping Strategy
  • Coping Style
  • Current Psychology
  • General Health Questionnaire