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The effects of filled waiting time and service provider control over the delay on evaluations of service

Abstract

This article reports on an experiment that investigated the effects of a delay, perceived control over a delay, and the extent to which time was filled during the delay on various performance evaluations in a service encounter. It was determined that delays lower customers’ overall evaluations of service and of the tangible and reliability attributes of the service in particular. When delayed, performance evaluations were affected by whether the service provider was perceived to have control over the delay and whether the customer’s waiting time was filled. Overall performance evaluations and performance evaluations of tangibility, reliability, and responsiveness were highest when perceived service provider control was low and the waiting customer’s time was filled. These evaluations were lowest when perceived service provider control was high and waiting time was not filled.

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She received her Ph.D. from the University of British Columbia.

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Taylor, S. The effects of filled waiting time and service provider control over the delay on evaluations of service. JAMS 23, 38 (1995). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02894610

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Keywords

  • Service Provider
  • Negative Affect
  • Service Evaluation
  • Career Path
  • Service Failure