Policing on prime-time: A comparison of television and real-world policing

Abstract

This paper provides an investigation of presentations of police and policing activities in two purposively selected contemporary prime-time entertainment justice shows and one reality-based justice show. With the exception of being portrayed as overly successful, television police were portrayed closely to real-life police in terms of their gender, racial composition, organization, tasks, role, and response to crime. As such, prime-time television may aid viewers in better understanding the role of police in American society by providing a basic orientation to police and police work through its mediated presentations. Further research is needed involving a more encompassing sample of prime-time justice shows for more generalizable conclusions to be asserted.

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Correspondence to Danielle M. Soulliere.

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Soulliere, D.M. Policing on prime-time: A comparison of television and real-world policing. Am J Crim Just 28, 215–233 (2004). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02885873

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Keywords

  • Criminal Justice
  • Police Officer
  • Police Department
  • Racial Composition
  • Police Work