On the origin of movable metal-type technique

Abstract

China is the birthplace of woodblock, copperplate and non-metal-type printing, movable metal-type technique, as the product of combination of copperplate and non-metal-type technique, also originated in China. However, the problem on the origin of metal-type has not well been solved for a long time. This paper proved that metal-type was cast and used for paper money printing in China since the early 12th century, copper-type and tin-type technique was further developed during the 13th to 14th centuries, on the basis of investigation of excavated findings, textual research and scientific judgment. Finally a comparative research of the early metal-type technique in China, Korea and Europe was briefly discussed. A lot of unearthed material evidence were provided here.

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Correspondence to Jixing Pan.

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Pan, J. On the origin of movable metal-type technique. Chin. Sci. Bull. 43, 1681–1692 (1998). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02883966

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Keywords

  • China
  • origin
  • copperplate
  • copper-type
  • tin-type
  • Song-Jin
  • Yuan-Ming