Economic Botany

, Volume 53, Issue 2, pp 203–216 | Cite as

1492 and the loss of amazonian crop genetic resources. ii. crop Biogeography at contact

  • Charles R. Clement
Article

Abstract

Fifty seven percent of the 138 cultivated plant species present in Amazonia at contact probably originated in the Amazon Basin and another 27% originated in lowland northern South America. The relationship between probable indigenous human population density and resultant agricultural intensification and crop diversity is used to propose the existence of a mosaic of crop genetic resource concentrations in Amazonia at contact, including two centers of diversity, four outlying minor centers, and five regions of diversity. This methodology is extrapolated to present a synthesis of South American crop genetic biogeography at contact.

Key Words

Amazonia Centers of diversity Regions of diversity South America 

1492 e a Perda dos Recursos Genéticos da Amazônia. IL A Biogeografia dos Cultivos no Momento DE Contato

Résumé

Cinquenta e sete por cento das 138 espécies cultivadas na Amazônia no momento do contato provavelmente originaram na bacia amazônica e mais 27% originaram nas terras baixas do norte de América do Sul. A relação entre a densidade populacional indigena hipotética e a intensificação agrícola e a diversidade genética dos cultivos resultantes é usada para propor a existência de um mosaico de concentraçÕes de recursos genéticos na Amazônia no momento de contato, incluindo dois centros de diversidade, quatro centros per-iféricos menores, e cinco regiÕes de diversidade. A mesma metodologia é extrapolada para apresentar uma síntese da biogeografia da diversidade genética dos cultivos na America do Sul no momento de contato.

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Copyright information

© New York Botanical Garden Press 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles R. Clement
    • 1
  1. 1.Instituto National de Pesquisas da AmazôniaManausBrasil

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