Metal ions in molecular association of porphyrins

  • V. Krishnan
Inorganic Chemistry

Abstract

Molecular association of porphyrins and their metal derivatives has been recognized as one of the important properties for many of their biological functions. The association is classified into (i) self-aggregation, (ii) intermolecular association and (iii) intramolecular association. The presence of metal ions in the porphyrin cavity is shown to alter the magnitudes of binding constants and thermodynamic parameters of complexation. The interaction between the porphyrin unit and the acceptor is described in terms of π-π interaction. The manifestation of charge transfer states both in the ground and excited states of these complexes is shown to influence the rates of excited state electron transfer reactions. Owing to paucity of crystal structure data, the time-averaged geometries of many of these complexes have been derived from magnetic resonance data.

Keywords

Metalloporphyrins molecular association charge transfer states intramolecular interactions intermolecular interactions porphyrins 

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Copyright information

© Indian Academy of Sciences 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. Krishnan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Inorganic and Physical ChemistryIndian Institute of ScienceBangaloreIndia

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