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Economic Botany

, Volume 47, Issue 2, pp 113–135 | Cite as

The botany, uses and production ofWasabia japonica (Miq.) (Cruciferae) Matsum

  • Catherine I. Chadwick
  • Thomas A. Lumpkin
  • Leslie R. Elberson
Article

Abstract

Wasabi (Wasabia japonica) is a unique native plant and a traditional condiment crop of Japan. It is used in traditional Japanese raw fish and noodle dishes and in several modern foods for its hot taste and tangy flavor. Japanese farmers grow the crop in wet upland orchard soils for leaves, petioles and small enlarged stems, and in flooded gravel and sand fields along streams or near springs to produce whole plants and large succulent green enlarged stems. Recent studies in Japan have demonstrated numerous enzymatic and biocidal properties of the plant. This review of Japanese and other literature details the history, uses, botany, cultivars, ecological requirements, production techniques, insect pests and diseases of wasabi.

Key Words

Wasabia japonica wasabi Japanese horseradish Cruciferae 

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Copyright information

© The New York Botanical Garden 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Catherine I. Chadwick
    • 1
  • Thomas A. Lumpkin
    • 1
  • Leslie R. Elberson
    • 1
  1. 1.Washington State UniversityPullmanUSA

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