Notes on distribution, propagation, and products ofBorassus Palms (Arecaceae)

Abstract

The palmyra, or toddy, palm (Borassus flabellifer L., Arecaceae) grows wild from the Persian Gulf to the Cambodian-Vietnamese border; is commonly cultivated in India, Southeast Asia, Malaysia and occasionally in other warm regions including Hawaii and southern Florida, where there are also a number of specimens of the similarB. aethiopum Mart. In addition to the sweet sap from the inflorescence and the many products of the leaves, trunk and underground seedlings, a thin orange pulp coating the fibers of the mature fruit is consumed fresh or dried as a paste. The large seeds, when immature, before the shell hardens, contain jelly-like kernels esteemed for food. These kernels, whole or sliced and canned in thin, clear sirup, are being exported from Thailand and are appearing in Asiatic markets across the United States. Mature kernels are hard as ivory. A number ofBorassus palms have succumbed to lethal-yellowing disease in Florida.

Zusammenfassung

Bemerkungen über Verbreitung, Fortpflanzung, und Produkte der Borassus Palmen (Arecaceae). Die Palm yra, oder Toddy, Palme (Borassus fiabellifer L., Arecaceae), wächst wild vom persischen Golf bis zur Cambodischen-Vietnamisischen Grenze; sie ist gewöhnlich in Indien, Sudost Asien, und Malaya kultiviert. Doch manchmal auch in anderen warmen Regionen wie Hawaii und auch süd Florida, wo es auch eine Anzahl von ähnlichen Speciments dieB. aethiopum Marl. gibt. Zusätzlich zu dem süssen Saft von der Blüte und den vielen Produkten von den Blättern, Stamm, und untergrund Setzlingen, ist eine dünne orangefarbe Schichte, die reife Frucht übersicht und wird entweder getrocknet oderfrisch als Paste genossen. Die grossen Samen enthalten Gelatine ähnliche Kerne, geniessbar bevor die Schale hart wird. Diese Kerne, ganz oder geschnitten werden in Dosen im Klaren Sirup nach Thailand exporliert und sind in den Vereinigte Slaaten am Asiatischen Markt erhältlich. Ausgewachsene Kerne sind hart wie Elf inbein. Eine Auswahl von Borassus Palmen sind in Florida einer Tödlichen-gelben Krankheit zum Opfer gefallen.

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Morton, J.F. Notes on distribution, propagation, and products ofBorassus Palms (Arecaceae). Econ Bot 42, 420–441 (1988). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02860166

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Keywords

  • Economic Botany
  • Mature Fruit
  • Trinidad
  • Virgin Island
  • Male Tree