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Wild and cultivated cucurbits in Nigeria

Abstract

The family Cucurbitaceae is represented in Nigeria by 21 genera, many of which are of considerable economic importance. Certain genera, such asTelfairia, Cucurbita andCitrullus, are commonly cultivated in southern Nigeria since their fruits and/or leaves constitute important items in the local diet. Other genera are significant as oil plants, medicinal plants, sources of tanning materials, sponges and household utensils.

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Okoli, B.E. Wild and cultivated cucurbits in Nigeria. Econ Bot 38, 350–357 (1984). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02859015

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Keywords

  • Sponge
  • Nigeria
  • Melon
  • Economic Botany
  • Bottle Gourd