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Use and management of Nipa palm (Nypa fruticans, arecaceae): a review

Abstract

Nipa palm (Nypa fruticans,) is a useful, versatile, and fairly common component of mangrove forests of Asia and Oceania. Because of its usefulness, it has been introduced into West Africa. In addition to a host of local subsistence uses ranging from medicines to hats and raincoats, some important commercial uses have led to management efforts and are initiating a new interest in its potential. Sap production from nipa produces an intoxicating beverage, sugar, vinegar, and alcohol that may be used as fuel. The tapping of nipa for sap involves a rather unusual kicking or beating process called “gonchanging. ” Further research in nipa sap production, together with development of more efficient collection and handling methods, might greatly enhance the usefulness of this palm.

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Hamilton, L.S., Murphy, D.H. Use and management of Nipa palm (Nypa fruticans, arecaceae): a review. Econ Bot 42, 206–213 (1988). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02858921

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02858921

Keywords

  • Malaysia
  • Economic Botany
  • Mangrove Forest
  • Saffron
  • Essig