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Brosimum alicastrum (Moraceae): uses and potential in Mexico

Abstract

Brosimum alicastrum is a large, evergreen tropical tree which is widely distributed in Mexico. Its protein-rich seeds and leaves may be used for food and forage, and several medicines and beverages can be made from parts of the tree. Although an important alternative food in pre-Columbian times, the current use of the tree is very limited. Recent studies indicate that its increased use would be extremely beneficial, and that the most immediate means for accomplishing this are the collection and processing of seeds from natural forests and the establishment of plantations for forage.

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Correspondence to Charles M. Peters.

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Peters, C.M., Pardo-Tejeda, E. Brosimum alicastrum (Moraceae): uses and potential in Mexico. Econ Bot 36, 166–175 (1982). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02858712

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Keywords

  • Natural Forest
  • Economic Botany
  • Leucaena Leucocephala
  • Roasted Seed
  • Fortum