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The continuum concept of vegetation

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McIntosh, R.P. The continuum concept of vegetation. Bot. Rev 33, 130–187 (1967). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02858667

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Keywords

  • Plant Community
  • Botanical Review
  • Gradient Analysis
  • Ordination Method
  • Upland Forest