Impulse magnetic-field therapy for migraine and other headaches: A double-blind, placebo-controlled study

Abstract

This double-blind, placebo-controlled study assessed the efficacy of 4 weeks of impulse magnetic-field therapy (16 Hz, 5 μTs), delivered through a small device, for different types of headache and migraine. Eighty-two patients were randomly assigned to receive either active treatment or placebo (n = 41 each) and were characterized according to one of seven diagnoses (migraine, migraine combined with tension, tension, cluster, weather-related, posttraumatic, or other). Efficacy was assessed in terms of duration, severity, and frequency of migraine and headache attacks, as well as ability to concentrate. Data for77 patients were analyzed. In the active-treatment group, all assessed criteria were significantly improved at the end of the study (P<.0001 vs baseline and placebo). Seventy-six percent of active-treatment patients experienced clear or very clear relief of their complaints. Only 1 placebo-patient (2.5%) felt some relief; 8% noted slight and 2% reported significant worsening of symptoms. No side effects were noted.

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Correspondence to Rainer B. Pelka Ph.D..

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Pelka, R.B., Jaenicke, C. & Gruenwald, J. Impulse magnetic-field therapy for migraine and other headaches: A double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Adv Therapy 18, 101–109 (2001). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02850298

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Keywords

  • headache
  • migraine
  • meteorosensitivity
  • alternative therapy
  • impulse magnetic-field therapy