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Preliminary studies on methane fluxes in Hainan mangrove communities

  • Lu Chang-yi
  • Wong Yuk-shan
  • Tam Nora F. Y.
  • Ye Yong
  • Cui Sheng-hui
  • Lin Peng
Article

Abstract

In this work, a static chamber technique was used to measure methane fluxes from sediments of six mangrove communities and polyethylene bags were used to measure methane fluxes across plant leaves of six mangrove species. Methane fluxes from mangrove sediments at the disturbed Ta—Shi (TS) site were higher than those at the other sites, indicating that organic matter in soil is an important source of methane fluxes from sediments. Tidal condition is more important than air and soil temperature in affecting diurnal variations of methane fluxes from mangrove sediments. The spatial differences of methane fluxes from sediments in three mudflat zones may be due to the differences of soil moisture. Methane fluxes across mangrove leaves may be negative or positive during different observation periods and mangrove leaves generally absorb atmospheric methane as an overall effect. Plant leaves of mangrove with pneumatophores absorb more atmospheric methane than those without pneumatophores.

Key words

methane fluxes mangrove communities Hainan China 

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Copyright information

© Science Press 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lu Chang-yi
    • 1
  • Wong Yuk-shan
    • 2
  • Tam Nora F. Y.
    • 3
  • Ye Yong
    • 4
  • Cui Sheng-hui
    • 1
  • Lin Peng
    • 4
  1. 1.Research Laboratory of SEDC of Marine Ecological EnvironmentXiamen UniversityXiamen
  2. 2.Research Centre/Biology DepartmentHong Kong University of Science and TechnologyHong Kong
  3. 3.Department of Biology and ChemistryCity University of Hong KongHong Kong
  4. 4.Department of BiologyXiamen UniversityXiamen

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